Roman

Ancient roman coins were minted from the 3rd century BC until the 5th century AD. Ancient roman coins commonly feature a portrait of an individual (e.g. the emperor) on the obverse and a deity on the reverse. Some of the most detailed portraits of an emperor can be found on an ancient roman coin. In many of these ancient roman coins we see what the roman emperors must have looked like in life. In this section you will also discover Roman Provincial (or Greek Imperial) coins.
Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD,  Cappadocia, Caesarea, AR Drachm, Mt. Argaeus, struck 139 AD

Antoninus Pius was one of the Five Good Emperors. Under his 23 year long reign, Rome saw peace that it had not seen for some time. On the obverse of this coin, an expectional portrait of the Emperor. On the reverse, the personification of the river Tiber, Tiberis, is depicted.…

Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD, AE Sestertius, Aequitas, struck 148-149 AD

Antoninus Pius was one of the Five Good Emperors. Under his 23 year long reign, Rome saw peace that it had not seen for some time. Aequitas is the derivative of the English word "equity".…

Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD, AE Sestertius, Emperor at Altar, struck 153-154 AD

Antoninus Pius was one of the Five Good Emperors. Under his 23 year long reign, Rome saw peace that it had not seen for some time.…

Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD, AE Sestertius, Tiberis Reclining, struck 140-144 AD

Antoninus Pius was one of the Five Good Emperors. Under his 23 year long reign, Rome saw peace that it had not seen for some time. On the obverse of this coin, an expectional portrait of the Emperor. On the reverse, the personification of the river Tiber, Tiberis, is depicted.…

Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD, Syria, Seleucis and Pieria, Antioch, AE28, SC

Antoninus Pius was one of the Five Good Emperors. Under his 23 year long reign, Rome saw peace that it had not seen for some time. This coin forms part of the large series of SC bronze coinage issued at the Antioch mint under different emperors.…

Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD, Syria, Seleucis and Pieria, Antioch, AE28, SC

Antoninus Pius was one of the Five Good Emperors. Under his 23 year long reign, Rome saw peace that it had not seen for some time. This coin forms part of the large series of SC bronze coinage issued at the Antioch mint under different emperors.…

Antoninus Pius, AE18 of Nicomedia, Bithynia, 138-161 AD

Antoninus Pius was one of the Five Good Emperors. Under his 23 year long reign, Rome saw peace that it had not seen for some time. Demeter was the Greek Goddess of harvest and agriculture.…

Antoninus Pius, AR Denarius, Tranquilitas, 150-151 AD

Antoninus Pius was one of the Five Good Emperors. Under his 23 year long reign, Rome saw peace that it had not seen for some time. Vesta was the Roman goddess of peace and tranquility. According to Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, the following events occurred during the issue of this coin: Victory in Mauretania Caesariensis; Apologia of S. Justin; earthquake in Bithynia and Hellenspont; and the inauguration of the Temple of Divus Hadrianus and Diva Sabina.…

Antoninus Pius, AR Denarius, Vesta,  153-155 AD

Antoninus Pius was one of the Five Good Emperors. Under his 23 year long reign, Rome saw peace that it had not seen for some time. Vesta is the virgin goddess of the hearth, home, and family. In her temple, was a hearth with a sacred fire which the Vestal virgins were responsible for ensuring never turned out.…

Antoninus Pius, Sestertius, Indulgentia, 153-154 AD

This sestertius of Antoninus Pius has one of the most stunning patinas we have ever seen on an ancient coin.

Antoninus Pius was one of the Five Good Emperors. Under his 23 year long reign, Rome saw peace that it had not seen for some time. Indulgentia was the Roman personification of indulgence and mercy. A rare deity not commonly seen on Roman coins. AC search.info lists just 366 examples of coins (of any Roman Emperor) with Indulgentia.…

Aurelian, Silvered Antoninianus, Roma, 270-275 AD

Aurelian worked his way through the ranks of the military before becoming Roman Emperor. Through successful campaigns including defeating the Gallic Empire in the west, and restoring parts of the Empire, he was able to end the Roman Empire's Crisis of the Third Century. Through this he earned the title Restitutor Orbis ('Restorer of the World') which is inscribed on much of the coinage issued in his name. During his reign, as part of coinage reform, the size of the antoninianus was increased and became silvered.…

Caracalla, 198-217 AD, AR Denarius, Apollo, struck 215 AD

Lucius Septimius Bassianus . He became known as 'Caracalla' after the Gallic cloak which he regularly wore. He was assassinated by a soldier on route to visiting a temple near Carrhae, whilst stopping briefly to attend to the call of nature. Three days later, Macrinus declared himself emperor. Caracalla's popularity with the military ensured he was not subject to a damnatio memoriae. Notwithstanding this, his reputation and legacy in history remains that of a cruel ruler, whose terrible deeds include the murder of his brother Geta and the massacre of Geta's supporters.…

Caracalla, 198-217 AD, AR Denarius, Emperor Sacrificing at Altar, struck 217 AD

Lucius Septimius Bassianus . He became known as 'Caracalla' after the Gallic cloak which he regularly wore. He was assassinated by a soldier on route to visiting a temple near Carrhae, whilst stopping briefly to attend to the call of nature. Three days later, Macrinus declared himself emperor. Caracalla's popularity with the military ensured he was not subject to a damnatio memoriae. Notwithstanding this, his reputation and legacy in history remains that of a cruel ruler, whose terrible deeds include the murder of his brother Geta and the massacre of Geta's supporters.…

Caracalla, 198-217 AD, AR Denarius, Felicitas, struck c. 196-198 AD

Lucius Septimius Bassianus . He became known as 'Caracalla' after the Gallic cloak which he regularly wore. He was assassinated by a soldier on route to visiting a temple near Carrhae, whilst stopping briefly to attend to the call of nature. Three days later, Macrinus declared himself emperor. Caracalla's popularity with the military ensured he was not subject to a damnatio memoriae. Notwithstanding this, his reputation and legacy in history remains that of a cruel ruler, whose terrible deeds include the murder of his brother Geta and the massacre of Geta's supporters.…

Caracalla, 198-217 AD, AR Denarius, Jupiter, struck 217 AD

Lucius Septimius Bassianus . He became known as 'Caracalla' after the Gallic cloak which he regularly wore. He was assassinated by a soldier on route to visiting a temple near Carrhae, whilst stopping briefly to attend to the call of nature. Three days later, Macrinus declared himself emperor. Caracalla's popularity with the military ensured he was not subject to a damnatio memoriae. Notwithstanding this, his reputation and legacy in history remains that of a cruel ruler, whose terrible deeds include the murder of his brother Geta and the massacre of Geta's supporters.…

Caracalla, 198-217 AD, AR Denarius, Liberalitas, struck 213-217 AD

Lucius Septimius Bassianus . He became known as 'Caracalla' after the Gallic cloak which he regularly wore. He was assassinated by a soldier on route to visiting a temple near Carrhae, whilst stopping briefly to attend to the call of nature. Three days later, Macrinus declared himself emperor. Caracalla's popularity with the military ensured he was not subject to a damnatio memoriae. Notwithstanding this, his reputation and legacy in history remains that of a cruel ruler, whose terrible deeds include the murder of his brother Geta and the massacre of Geta's supporters.…

Caracalla, 198-217 AD, AR Denarius, Roma, struck 202 AD

Lucius Septimius Bassianus . He became known as 'Caracalla' after the Gallic cloak which he regularly wore. He was assassinated by a soldier on route to visiting a temple near Carrhae, whilst stopping briefly to attend to the call of nature. Three days later, Macrinus declared himself emperor. Caracalla's popularity with the military ensured he was not subject to a damnatio memoriae. Notwithstanding this, his reputation and legacy in history remains that of a cruel ruler, whose terrible deeds include the murder of his brother Geta and the massacre of Geta's supporters.…

Caracalla, 198-217 AD, AR Denarius, Roma, struck 203 AD

Lucius Septimius Bassianus . He became known as 'Caracalla' after the Gallic cloak which he regularly wore. He was assassinated by a soldier on route to visiting a temple near Carrhae, whilst stopping briefly to attend to the call of nature. Three days later, Macrinus declared himself emperor. Caracalla's popularity with the military ensured he was not subject to a damnatio memoriae. Notwithstanding this, his reputation and legacy in history remains that of a cruel ruler, whose terrible deeds include the murder of his brother Geta and the massacre of Geta's supporters.…

Caracalla, 198-217 AD, Lydia, Thyatira, AE21, Tyche Soterios

Lucius Septimius Bassianus . He became known as 'Caracalla' after the Gallic cloak which he regularly wore. He was assassinated by a soldier on route to visiting a temple near Carrhae, whilst stopping briefly to attend to the call of nature. Three days later, Macrinus declared himself emperor. Caracalla's popularity with the military ensured he was not subject to a damnatio memoriae. Notwithstanding this, his reputation and legacy in history remains that of a cruel ruler, whose terrible deeds include the murder of his brother Geta and the massacre of Geta's supporters.…

Caracalla, 198-217 AD, Syria, Seleucis and Pieria, Antioch, AE22, SC, struck 213-215 AD

Lucius Septimius Bassianus . He became known as 'Caracalla' after the Gallic cloak which he regularly wore. He was assassinated by a soldier on route to visiting a temple near Carrhae, whilst stopping briefly to attend to the call of nature. Three days later, Macrinus declared himself emperor. Caracalla's popularity with the military ensured he was not subject to a damnatio memoriae. Notwithstanding this, his reputation and legacy in history remains that of a cruel ruler, whose terrible deeds include the murder of his brother Geta and the massacre of Geta's supporters.…

Caracalla, 198-217 AD, Syria, Seleucis and Pieria, Antioch, AR Tetradrachm, Eagle, struck c. 214-215 AD

Butcher notes that the style of this tetradrachm departs from those closest in style to the Antiochene tetradrachms of the Severans. Firstly the wreath on Caracalla's head is arranged 2-1-2-1-3, which he says unusual. Secondly, the obverse legend is different. Thirdly, the eagle on the reverse stands on an animal thigh whose foot points left. He suggests three possibilities: that this type is the work of a different engraver at the same mint; alternative, that they are chronologically separate products of the same mint; or they are the products of two different mints: see p. 114.…

Caracalla, AR Denarius, Hercules, 212 AD

Superb portrait. Coin has almost no wear despite its ancient age. Coin would make a great addition to any collection with a mythological theme. Arguably the most well known mythological creature, Hercules, the son of God, was known for his great strength. Caracalla, is known for being one of the cruelest of the Roman Emperors. The name "Caracalla" was reportedly named after a long Gallic cloak which he wore.…

Caracalla, AR Denarius, Liberalitas, 210-213 AD

Nicely toned. Caracalla, is known for being one of the cruelest of the Roman Emperors. The name "Caracalla" was reportedly named after a long Gallic cloak which he wore. In Ancient Rome, Liberalitas was the virtue of generosity.…

Caracalla, with Julia Domna, 198-217 AD, Moesia Inferior, Marcianopolis, AE Pentassarion, Tyche, struck 215 AD

Lucius Septimius Bassianus . He became known as 'Caracalla' after the Gallic cloak which he regularly wore. He was assassinated by a soldier on route to visiting a temple near Carrhae, whilst stopping briefly to attend to the call of nature. Three days later, Macrinus declared himself emperor. Caracalla's popularity with the military ensured he was not subject to a damnatio memoriae. Notwithstanding this, his reputation and legacy in history remains that of a cruel ruler, whose terrible deeds include the murder of his brother Geta and the massacre of Geta's supporters. This coin was struck under the consular legate Quintillianus in Marcianopolis, a city founded by Trajan and named after his sister, Marciana.…

Claudius, 41 to 54 AD, Syria, Seleucis and Pieria, Antioch, AE25, SC, struck c. 41-54 AD

Tiberius Claudius Caesar Augustus Germanicus was Emperor of Rome from 41 to 54 AD. The first Roman Emperor born outside Italy he suffered from a limp and sligh deafness. Despite this, he proved a capable Emperor. At age 63, he died in 54 AD, possibly at his wife's hands, and was succeeded by his adopted son Nero as Emperor. This coin was struck at the Antioch mint in Syria. Due to the different style (dot above and below), Butcher classifies this coin as being minted in an intermediate period between the earlier and later issues of Claudius or alternatively the product of ancient counterfeiters.Accordingly a more precise date cannot be attributed to this coin. The purpose of the pellets and numeral letters on the coins from Antioch must have served some purpose but what that purpose was exactly has been lost in time and remains today the subject of some speculation.…

Claudius, 41-54 AD, Ae As, Constantia, struck 42 AD

Tiberius Claudius Caesar Augustus Germanicus was Emperor of Rome from 41 to 54 AD. The first Roman Emperor born outside Italy he suffered from a limp and slight deafness. Despite this, he proved a capable Emperor. At age 63, he died in 54 AD, possibly at his wife's hands, and was succeeded by his adopted son Nero as Emperor.…

Commodus, 177-192 AD, Egypt, Alexandria, BI Tetradrachm, Zeus-Ammon, struck 186/187 AD

Commodus was the son of Marcus Aurelius. A megalomaniac, he liked to portray himself as Hercules, as evidenced in numerous statues which exist today, as well as fight as a gladiator, often exotic animals such as lions and elephants. Famous in present day, for his portrayal in the 2000 film, Gladiator.…

Crispina, 177-192 AD, AE Dupondius, struck 180-183 AD

Bruttia Crispina was Roman Empress from 178 to 191 and wife to Commodus. Her marriage to Commodus failed to produce an heir. After 10 years, she was banished to the island of Capri on false charges of adultery, then executed. Juno, was a Roman Goddess who protected the state and also the women of Rome. Often featured with a peacock (not on this coin).…

Crispina, Ancient Imitative of Ae As, Juno, 180-183 AD

Most likely an ancient imitative ("cast limes falsa") of an official issue. Bruttia Crispina was Roman Empress from 178 to 191 and wife to Commodus. Her marriage to Commodus failed to produce an heir. After 10 years, she was banished to the island of Capri on false charges of adultery, then executed. Juno, was a Roman Goddess who protected the state and also the women of Rome. Often featured with a peacock (not on this coin).…

Domitian AE As, 87 AD

Beautifully preserved green patina. A much lighter shade of green than appears in the photos. Nice example of a portrait of Emperor Domitian with much of the inscription of both sides preserved.…

Domitian, 81-96 AD, AR Denarius, Minerva, struck 90 AD

Domitianus (Domitian) was the son and heir of the Roman Emperor Vespasian. His 15 year reign (the longest since Tiberius) came to an abrupt end when he was assassinated by court officials. The Roman goddess Minerva was the daughter of Jupiter. The Roman equivalent of Athena, she is similarly the goddess of wisdom. Often shown with an owl, which symbolises wisdom. One week prior to his assassination, Domitian reportedly had a dream in which Minerva warned him that she was no longer able to protect him.…

Domitian, 81-96 AD, AR Denarius, Minerva, struck 92 AD

Domitianus (Domitian) was the son and heir of the Roman Emperor Vespasian. His 15 year reign (the longest since Tiberius) came to an abrupt end when he was assassinated by court officials. The Roman goddess Minerva was the daughter of Jupiter. The Roman equivalent of Athena, she is similarly the goddess of wisdom. Often shown with an owl, which symbolises wisdom. One week prior to his assassination, Domitian reportedly had a dream in which Minerva warned him that she was no longer able to protect him.…

Domitian, 81-96 AD, Syria, Seleucis and Pieria, Antioch, AR Tetradrachm, Eagle, struck 91-92 AD

An extremely rare coin, there are only 23 of this type known and this coin is one of, if not the finest examples. The portrait itself is of superb style and certainly among the finest portraits known of Domitian on any coin of any denomination. This coin once likely belonged to a German soldier in a Roman legion: there were many Germans in the Roman army of the East. Personal ownership is evidenced by the ancient graffiti in the right field of the obverse which reads E P M A. Refer photos to the right to take a closer look. This coin was found around Petra, a city south of Jordan and far from the soldier's homeland.…

Domitian, AE As, Fides Publica, 86 AD

Domitianus (Domitian) was the son and heir of the Roman Emperor Vespasian. His 15 year reign (the longest since Tiberius) came to an abrupt end when he was assassinated by court officials. Fides, on the reverse of this coin, was the Roman goddess of good faith and honesty. Her purpose was to oversee the moral integrity of the Roman people. Later she became known as Fides Publica ("Public Faith", as described on the reverse of this coin) and her function evolved to becoming the guardian of treaties and other state documents which were stored in her temple. H. Mattingly theorises that the appearance of Fides on the coinage of Domitian is closely linked to the role of the Emperor as censor (BMCRE II, p. xci). The CENSPER PP in the obverse legend represents Domitian making himself censor for life ("censer perpentuus"). In the year in which this coin was struck, the following events occur: Decebalus of Dacia attacks Moesia; Domitian with Cornelius Fuscus takes the field; the 'agon Capitolinus' instituted; and the revolt of the Nasamones in Africa (BMCRE II, p. lxxx).…

Domitian, AE As, Fortuna Augusta, 92-94 AD

Domitianus (Domitian) was the son and heir of the Roman Emperor Vespasian. His 15 year reign (the longest since Tiberius) came to an abrupt end when he was assassinated by court officials. The CENSPER PP in the obverse legend represents Domitian making himself censor for life ("censer perpentuus"). Fortuna was the Roman goddess of fortune and the personification of luck. She is often shown with a ship's rudder and a cornucopiae. She is shown with the rudder with which she steers the world, the cornucopiae from which she dispenses plenty. Fortuna Augusta is an aspect of Fortuna which looks after the prosperity of the Emperor. H.Mattingly speculates that the appearance of Fortuna Augusta on coinage issued under Domitian is possibly linked to the dedication of the temple of the gens Flavia (BMCRE II, p. xcii). In the years 92-94 AD in which this coin was likely struck, the following events occur: Edict of Domitian ordering destruction of vines in provinces. War against Sarmatae and Suevi ended by Domitian in person. Domitian returns to Rome. Second expulsion of philosophers. Persecution of opposition leaders in Rome. Important buildings completed in Rome, the 'Capitolium', the 'forum transitorium', the 'divorum porticus', the 'Iseum…

Domitian, AR Denarius, Pegasus, 79-80 AD

An excellent coin for collectors of mythological creatures on ancient coins. Arguably the Pegasus is amongst the most famous creatures of Greek mythology. The son of Poseidon and Medusa, Pegasus, the winged horse feature, is found everywhere on ancient Greek and Roman coins, pottery and art.…

Domitian, Augustus, 81-96 AD, Syria, Seleucis and Pieria, Antioch, AE30, SC, struck 81-83 AD

Domitianus (Domitian) was the son and heir of the Roman Emperor Vespasian. His 15 year reign (the longest since Tiberius) came to an abrupt end when he was assassinated by court officials. The Antioch coinage of Domitian was struck both during Vespasian's reign and during Domitian's own reign as Roman Emperor. This coin was struck under Domitian's reign, evident by the broader leaves, simplified ties at the bottom of the wreath; the simplified wreath tie on the obverse' and the theta under the SC. Under Domitian's reign, the pellets would later be replaced with a numerical system. The purpose of the pellets and numeral letters on the coins from Antioch must have served some purpose but what that purpose was exactly has been lost in time and remains today the subject of some speculation.…

Domitian, Caesar, 69-81 AD, Syria, Seleucis and Pieria, Antioch, AE21, SC, struck 69-79 AD

Domitianus (Domitian) was the son and heir of the Roman Emperor Vespasian. His 15 year reign (the longest since Tiberius) came to an abrupt end when he was assassinated by court officials. The Antioch coinage of Domitian was struck both during Vespasian's reign and during Domitian's own reign as Roman Emperor. This coin was struck under Vespasian's reign, evident by the long thin leaves and looped ties at the bottom of the wreath. Under Domitian's reign, the pellets would later be replaced with a numerical system. The purpose of the pellets and numeral letters on the coins from Antioch must have served some purpose but what that purpose was exactly has been lost in time and remains today the subject of some speculation.…

Elagabalus, 218-222 AD, AE21, Syria, Seleucis and Pieria, Antioch, SC

Elagabalus was Roman Emperor from 218 to 222 AD. Born in Syria, he was later named after the god Elagabal whom he served as a priest in his youth. He lived an extremely eccentric and decadent life showing total disregard for Roman traditions. This most likely led to his assassination at the young age of 18 in a plot organised by his aunt, Julia Maesa.…

Elagabalus, 218-222 AD, AE26, Moesia Inferior, Marcianopolis, Demeter

Elagabalus was Roman Emperor from 218 to 222 AD. Born in Syria, he was later named after the god Elagabal whom he served as a priest in his youth. He lived an extremely eccentric and decadent life showing total disregard for Roman traditions. This most likely led to his assassination at the young age of 18 in a plot organised by his aunt, Julia Maesa. This coin was struck under the consular legate Sergius Titianus in Marcianopolis, a city founded by Trajan and named after his sister, Marciana.…

Elagabalus, 218-222 AD, AE26, Moesia Inferior, Marcianopolis, Nemesis

Elagabalus was Roman Emperor from 218 to 222 AD. Born in Syria, he was later named after the god Elagabal whom he served as a priest in his youth. He lived an extremely eccentric and decadent life showing total disregard for Roman traditions. This most likely led to his assassination at the young age of 18 in a plot organised by his aunt, Julia Maesa. The city of Marcianopolis was founded by Trajan and named after his sister Marciana.…

Elagabalus, 218-222 AD, AR Denarius, Emperor at Altar, struck 221 AD

Elagabalus was Roman Emperor from 218 to 222 AD. Born in Syria, he was later named after the god Elagabal whom he served as a priest in his youth. He lived an extremely eccentric and decadent life showing total disregard for Roman traditions. This most likely led to his assassination at the young age of 18 in a plot organised by his aunt, Julia Maesa.…

Elagabalus, AE30, Provincial, Samosata, Tyche, 218 to 222 AD

Elagabalus was Roman Emperor from 218 to 222 AD. Born in Syria, he was later named after the god Elagabal whom he served as a priest in his youth. He lived an extremely eccentric and decadent life showing total disregard for Roman traditions. This most likely led to his assassination at the young age of 18 in a plot organised by his aunt, Julia Maesa.…

Elagabalus, with Julia Maesa, 218-222 AD, Moesia Inferior, Marcianopolis, AE Pentassarion, Tyche, struck 220-221 AD

Elagabalus was Roman Emperor from 218 to 222 AD. Born in Syria, he was later named after the god Elagabal whom he served as a priest in his youth. He lived an extremely eccentric and decadent life showing total disregard for Roman traditions. This most likely led to his assassination at the young age of 18 in a plot organised by his aunt, Julia Maesa. This coin was struck under the consular legate Julius Antonius Seleucus in Marcianopolis, a city founded by Trajan and named after his sister, Marciana.…

Faustina I the Elder, 138-141 AD, AE As, Altar, Posthumous Issue, struck c. 141-146 AD

Faustina I the elder was born circa 100 AD and died in 140 AD. She was the wife of the Roman emperor Antoninus Pius, one of the Five Good Emperors. For many years after her passing, Antoninus Pius continued to honour her memory through the issuing of coinage in her image. This Ae As was part of a second such issue of coinage and dates to a period beginning in 141 AD and immediately afterwards. A more precise dating is unknown. As the obverse legend still contains AVGVSTA it is likely that this coin was struck prior to the title of Augusta being passed onto her daughter, Faustina II, the Younger in 147 AD. The reverse type for this coin depicts an altar, from the Temple of Faustina. On some coins, the altar is lighted.…

Faustina I the Elder, 138-141 AD, AE As, Vesta, Posthumous issue, struck 146-161 AD

Faustina I the elder was born circa 100 AD and died in 140 AD. She was the wife of the Roman emperor Antoninus Pius, one of the Five Good Emperors. This As was part of a third issue of coinage in her honour after her death and is likely to have been minted some time between the end of the second issue (141 AD) and the end of Antonius Pius's reign as Roman Emperor, most likely toward the end of that reign. A more precise dating is not currently known. The coinage bears the legend DIVA FAVSTINA, not DIVA AVGVSTA, as the title of Augusta had passed onto her daughter, Faustina II the Younger.…

Faustina I the Elder, 138-141 AD, AE Sestertius, Aeternitas, Posthumous Issue, struck 141-161 AD

Faustina I the elder was born circa 100 AD and died in 140 AD. She was the wife of the Roman emperor Antoninus Pius, one of the Five Good Emperors. This sestertius was part of a third issue of coinage in her honour after her death and is likely to have been minted some time between the end of the second issue (141 AD) and the end of Antonius Pius's reign as Roman Emperor, most likely toward the end of that reign. A more precise dating is not currently known. The coinage bears the legend DIVA FAVSTINA, not DIVA AVGVSTA, as the title of Augusta had passed onto her daughter, Faustina II the Younger.…

Faustina I the Elder, 138-141 AD, AE Sestertius, Aeternitas, Posthumous Issue, struck 141-161 AD

Faustina I the elder was born circa 100 AD and died in 140 AD. She was the wife of the Roman emperor Antoninus Pius, one of the Five Good Emperors. This sestertius was part of a third issue of coinage in her honour after her death and is likely to have been minted some time between the end of the second issue (141 AD) and the end of Antonius Pius's reign as Roman Emperor, most likely toward the end of that reign. A more precise dating is not currently known. The coinage bears the legend DIVA FAVSTINA, not DIVA AVGVSTA, as the title of Augusta had passed onto her daughter, Faustina II the Younger. Aeternitas was the divine personification of eternity. According to Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, Antoninus Pius used Aeternitas to emphasise the 'eternal' nature of the Empire in the person of its good Emperors and Empresses. In this case, it was also likely used to honour the legacy of his late wife.…

Faustina I the Elder, 138-141 AD, AE Sestertius, Ceres, Posthumous Issue, struck 141-161 AD

Faustina I the elder was born circa 100 AD and died in 140 AD. She was the wife of the Roman emperor Antoninus Pius, one of the Five Good Emperors. This sestertius was part of a third issue of coinage in her honour after her death and is likely to have been minted some time between the end of the second issue (141 AD) and the end of Antonius Pius's reign as Roman Emperor, most likely toward the end of that reign. A more precise dating is not currently known. The coinage bears the legend DIVA FAVSTINA, not DIVA AVGVSTA, as the title of Augusta had passed onto her daughter, Faustina II the Younger. Ceres was the Roman goddess of agriculture. She features prominently on coins of Faustina.…

Faustina I the Elder, 138-141 AD, AE Sestertius, Ceres, Posthumous Issue, struck 141-161 AD

Faustina I the elder was born circa 100 AD and died in 140 AD. She was the wife of the Roman emperor Antoninus Pius, one of the Five Good Emperors. This sestertius was part of a third issue of coinage in her honour after her death and is likely to have been minted some time between the end of the second issue (141 AD) and the end of Antonius Pius's reign as Roman Emperor, most likely toward the end of that reign. A more precise dating is not currently known. The coinage bears the legend DIVA FAVSTINA, not DIVA AVGVSTA, as the title of Augusta had passed onto her daughter, Faustina II the Younger. Ceres was the Roman goddess of agriculture. She features prominently on coins of Faustina.…

Faustina I the Elder, 138-141 AD, AE Sestertius, Ceres, Posthumous Issue, struck 141-161 AD

Faustina I the elder was born circa 100 AD and died in 140 AD. She was the wife of the Roman emperor Antoninus Pius, one of the Five Good Emperors. This sestertius was part of a third issue of coinage in her honour after her death and is likely to have been minted some time between the end of the second issue (141 AD) and the end of Antonius Pius's reign as Roman Emperor, most likely toward the end of that reign. A more precise dating is not currently known. The coinage bears the legend DIVA FAVSTINA, not DIVA AVGVSTA, as the title of Augusta had passed onto her daughter, Faustina II the Younger. Ceres was the Roman goddess of agriculture. She features prominently on coins of Faustina.…

Faustina I the Elder, 138-141 AD, AE Sestertius, Venus, Lifetime issue, struck 139-141 AD

Faustina I the elder was born circa 100 AD and died in 140 AD. She was the wife of the Roman emperor Antoninus Pius, one of the Five Good Emperors. She died prematurely and was honoured by her late husband by a series of posthumous coinage issues. Most coins of Faustina belong to the posthumous issues. This sestertius however was issued during her lifetime.…

Faustina I the Elder, 138-141 AD, AR Denarius, Aeternitas, Providentia or Urania, Posthumous Issue, struck 141-161 AD

Faustina I the elder was born circa 100 AD and died in 140 AD. She was the wife of the Roman emperor Antoninus Pius, one of the Five Good Emperors. This denarius was part of a third issue of coinage in her honour after her death and is likely to have been minted some time between the end of the second issue (141 AD) and the end of Antonius Pius's reign as Roman Emperor, most likely toward the end of that reign. A more precise dating is not currently known. The coinage bears the legend DIVA FAVSTINA, not DIVA AVGVSTA, as the title of Augusta had passed onto her daughter, Faustina II the Younger.…

Faustina I the Elder, 138-141 AD, AR Denarius, Ceres, Posthumous Issue, struck 141-161 AD

Faustina I the elder was born circa 100 AD and died in 140 AD. She was the wife of the Roman emperor Antoninus Pius, one of the Five Good Emperors. This sestertius was part of a third issue of coinage in her honour after her death and is likely to have been minted some time between the end of the second issue (141 AD) and the end of Antonius Pius's reign as Roman Emperor, most likely toward the end of that reign. A more precise dating is not currently known. The coinage bears the legend DIVA FAVSTINA, not DIVA AVGVSTA, as the title of Augusta had passed onto her daughter, Faustina II the Younger. Ceres was the Roman goddess of agriculture. She features prominently on coins of Faustina.…

Faustina I the Elder, 138-141 AD, AR Denarius, Ceres, Posthumous Issue, struck 141-161 AD

Faustina I the elder was born circa 100 AD and died in 140 AD. She was the wife of the Roman emperor Antoninus Pius, one of the Five Good Emperors. This sestertius was part of a third issue of coinage in her honour after her death and is likely to have been minted some time between the end of the second issue (141 AD) and the end of Antonius Pius's reign as Roman Emperor, most likely toward the end of that reign. A more precise dating is not currently known. The coinage bears the legend DIVA FAVSTINA, not DIVA AVGVSTA, as the title of Augusta had passed onto her daugher, Faustina II the Younger. Ceres was the Roman goddess of agriculture. She features prominently on coins of Faustina.…

Faustina I the Elder, 138-141 AD, AR Denarius, Ceres, Posthumous issue, struck 141-161 AD

Faustina I the elder was born circa 100 AD and died in 140 AD. She was the wife of the Roman emperor Antoninus Pius, one of the Five Good Emperors. This sestertius was part of a third issue of coinage in her honour after her death and is likely to have been minted some time between the end of the second issue (141 AD) and the end of Antonius Pius's reign as Roman Emperor, most likely toward the end of that reign. A more precise dating is not currently known. The coinage bears the legend DIVA FAVSTINA, not DIVA AVGVSTA, as the title of Augusta had passed onto her daughter, Faustina II the Younger. Ceres was the Roman goddess of agriculture. She features prominently on coins of Faustina.…

Faustina I the Elder, 138-141 AD, AR Denarius, Ceres, Posthumous Issue, struck 141-161 AD

Faustina I the elder was born circa 100 AD and died in 140 AD. She was the wife of the Roman emperor Antoninus Pius, one of the Five Good Emperors. This sestertius was part of a third issue of coinage in her honour after her death and is likely to have been minted some time between the end of the second issue (141 AD) and the end of Antonius Pius's reign as Roman Emperor, most likely toward the end of that reign. A more precise dating is not currently known. The coinage bears the legend DIVA FAVSTINA, not DIVA AVGVSTA, as the title of Augusta had passed onto her daughter, Faustina II the Younger. Ceres was the Roman goddess of agriculture. She features prominently on coins of Faustina.…

Faustina I the Elder, 138-141 AD, AR Denarius, Ceres, Posthumous Issue, struck 141-161 AD

Faustina I the elder was born circa 100 AD and died in 140 AD. She was the wife of the Roman emperor Antoninus Pius, one of the Five Good Emperors. This sestertius was part of a third issue of coinage in her honour after her death and is likely to have been minted some time between the end of the second issue (141 AD) and the end of Antonius Pius's reign as Roman Emperor, most likely toward the end of that reign. A more precise dating is not currently known. The coinage bears the legend DIVA FAVSTINA, not DIVA AVGVSTA, as the title of Augusta had passed onto her daughter, Faustina II the Younger. Ceres was the Roman goddess of agriculture. She features prominently on coins of Faustina.…

Faustina I the Elder, 138-141 AD, AR Denarius, Ceres, Posthumous issue, struck 141-161 AD

Faustina I the elder was born circa 100 AD and died in 140 AD. She was the wife of the Roman emperor Antoninus Pius, one of the Five Good Emperors. This sestertius was part of a third issue of coinage in her honour after her death and is likely to have been minted some time between the end of the second issue (141 AD) and the end of Antonius Pius's reign as Roman Emperor, most likely toward the end of that reign. A more precise dating is not currently known. The coinage bears the legend DIVA FAVSTINA, not DIVA AVGVSTA, as the title of Augusta had passed onto her daughter, Faustina II the Younger. Ceres was the Roman goddess of agriculture. She features prominently on coins of Faustina.…

Faustina I the Elder, 138-141 AD, AR Denarius, Ceres, Posthumous issue, struck 141-161 AD

Faustina I the elder was born circa 100 AD and died in 140 AD. She was the wife of the Roman emperor Antoninus Pius, one of the Five Good Emperors. This denarius was part of a third issue of coinage in her honour after her death and is likely to have been minted some time between the end of the second issue (141 AD) and the end of Antonius Pius's reign as Roman Emperor, most likely toward the end of that reign. A more precise dating is not currently known. The coinage bears the legend DIVA FAVSTINA, not DIVA AVGVSTA, as the title of Augusta had passed onto her daughter, Faustina II the Younger. Ceres was the Roman goddess of agriculture. She features prominently on coins of Faustina.…

Faustina I the Elder, 138-141 AD, AR Denarius, Hexastyle Temple, Posthumous Issue, struck 141-161 AD

Faustina I the elder was born circa 100 AD and died in 140 AD. She was the wife of the Roman emperor Antoninus Pius, one of the Five Good Emperors. This denarius was part of a third issue of coinage in her honour after her death and is likely to have been minted some time between the end of the second issue (141 AD) and the end of Antonius Pius's reign as Roman Emperor, most likely toward the end of that reign. A more precise dating is not currently known. The coinage bears the legend DIVA FAVSTINA, not DIVA AVGVSTA, as the title of Augusta had passed onto her daughter, Faustina II the Younger. The Temple of Faustina was dedicated to Faustina in 144 AD. It still stands today in the Roman Forum.…

Faustina I the Elder, 138-141 AD, AR Denarius, Hexastyle Temple, Posthumous Issue, struck 141-161 AD

Faustina I the elder was born circa 100 AD and died in 140 AD. She was the wife of the Roman emperor Antoninus Pius, one of the Five Good Emperors. This denarius was part of a third issue of coinage in her honour after her death and is likely to have been minted some time between the end of the second issue (141 AD) and the end of Antonius Pius's reign as Roman Emperor, most likely toward the end of that reign. A more precise dating is not currently known. The coinage bears the legend DIVA FAVSTINA, not DIVA AVGVSTA, as the title of Augusta had passed onto her daughter, Faustina II the Younger. The Temple of Faustina was dedicated to Faustina in 144 AD. It still stands today in the Roman Forum.…

Faustina I the Elder, 138-141 AD, AR Denarius, Hexastyle Temple, Posthumous Issue, struck 141-161 AD

Faustina I the elder was born circa 100 AD and died in 140 AD. She was the wife of the Roman emperor Antoninus Pius, one of the Five Good Emperors. This denarius was part of a third issue of coinage in her honour after her death and is likely to have been minted some time between the end of the second issue (141 AD) and the end of Antonius Pius's reign as Roman Emperor, most likely toward the end of that reign. A more precise dating is not currently known. The coinage bears the legend DIVA FAVSTINA, not DIVA AVGVSTA, as the title of Augusta had passed onto her daughter, Faustina II the Younger. The Temple of Faustina was dedicated to Faustina in 144 AD. It still stands today in the Roman Forum.…

Faustina I the Elder, 138-141 AD, AR Denarius, Peacock, Posthumous Issue, struck 141-161 AD

Faustina I the elder was born circa 100 AD and died in 140 AD. She was the wife of the Roman emperor Antoninus Pius, one of the Five Good Emperors. This sestertius was part of a third issue of coinage in her honour after her death and is likely to have been minted some time between the end of the second issue (141 AD) and the end of Antonius Pius's reign as Roman Emperor, most likely toward the end of that reign. A more precise dating is not currently known. The coinage bears the legend DIVA FAVSTINA, not DIVA AVGVSTA, as the title of Augusta had passed onto her daughter, Faustina II the Younger. The reverse legend, CONSECRATIO refers to the consecration of Faustina; the peacock of Juno symbolises her ascension into heaven and into divinity.…

Faustina I the Elder, 138-141 AD, AR Denarius, Throne, Lifetime Issue, struck 139-140 AD

Faustina I the elder was born circa 100 AD and died in 140 AD. She was the wife of the Roman emperor Antoninus Pius, one of the Five Good Emperors. She died prematurely and was honoured by her late husband by a series of posthumous coinage issues. Most coins of Faustina belong to the posthumous issues. This sestertius however was issued during her lifetime.…

Faustina I the Elder, 138-141 AD, AR Denarius, Throne, Posthumous Issue, struck c. 141-161 AD

Faustina I the elder was born circa 100 AD and died in 140 AD. She was the wife of the Roman emperor Antoninus Pius, one of the Five Good Emperors. This denarius was part of a third issue of coinage in her honour after her death and is likely to have been minted some time between the end of the second issue (141 AD) and the end of Antonius Pius's reign as Roman Emperor, most likely toward the end of that reign. A more precise dating is not currently known. The coinage bears the legend DIVA FAVSTINA, not DIVA AVGVSTA, as the title of Augusta had passed onto her daughter, Faustina II the Younger. This places the date of this coinage most likely to a date after Faustina II became Augusta, on the birth of her first child in December 147 AD.…

Faustina I the Elder, 138-141 AD, Barbaric Tribal Denarius Imitative, struck 140-150 AD

This coin is a tribal imitative of a rare life-time denarius of Faustina I. Perhaps struck by the the Celts or Getae, there is no mistaking the crude style attempting to replicate an official issue. The portrait on the obverse more closely resembles Faustina II than Faustina I meaning this coin potentially combines a Faustina II obverse with a Faustina I reverse type - a mother-daughter combination. Faustina I the elder was born circa 100 AD and died in 140 AD. She was the wife of the Roman emperor Antoninus Pius, one of the Five Good Emperors.…

Faustina II the Younger, 147-175 AD, AE As, Juno, struck c. 147-150 AD

Faustina II 'the Younger' ('Annia Galeria Faustina Minor) was the daughter of the Roman Emperor Antoninus Pius and Faustina I 'the Elder', and the wife of Roman Emperor, Marcus Aurelius. Juno, was a Roman Goddess who protected the state and also the women of Rome. Often featured with a peacock (not on this coin).…

Faustina II the Younger, Sestertius, 168-169 AD

It is much less common to see a portrait of Faustina the Younger in which she is wearing a stephane in her hair. Faustina the Younger was the wife of Emperor Marcus Aurelius (known to many as the Emperor at the start of the movie Gladiator). Interestingly the estimated dating of Faustina's coins is by reference to her coiffure (hairstyle). A detailed portrait accommodated by the large size of the sestertius, with most details visible and inscriptions legible. Appears to have had some restoration on the reverse by a previous owner.…

Galerius, As Caesar, 293-305 AD, AE Follis, Genius, struck c 295-296 AD

Galerius was Roman Emperor from 305 to 311 AD. A leading figure in the persecution of Christians, he issued an edict of toleration from Nicomedia, six days before he died, officially ending the Diocletianic persecution of Christianity in the East.…

Gallienus, 253-268 AD, Caria, Antiochia ad Maeandrum, AE30,  Maenander River Bridge

Gallienus was Roman Emperor from 253-268 AD. He ruled during the Crisis of the Third Century, a time when the Roman empire was under threat. This coin features an architectural reverse with a detailed bridge which crosses over the river Maenander.…

Geta, 200-209 AD, AR Denarius, Geta with Trophy, struck 200-202 AD

Geta was Roman emperor from 209 AD, together with his father, Septimius Severus, and his older brother, Caracalla. Caracalla, reputed to be one of the crulest Roman Emperors, conspired to kill his brother. He succeeded and became sole emperor.…

Gordian III AR Antoninianus, Virtus, 238-239 AD

Nicely struck. Very little wear. Gordian III became the youngest sole Roman emperor at the age of 13 after the death of Emperor Severus Alexander. The last of the 6 Emperors in the tumultuous Year of the 6 emperors - the year 238AD in which 6 people had been Roman Emperor. His reign was not long. He died at the age of 19, possibly at Zaitha at the hands of his army, or in battle against the Sassanids.…

Gordian III Sestertius, Sol, 240 AD

Nice patina. Uneven shaped flan. Marks on obverse suggest it may have been double-struck. Gordian III became the youngest sole Roman emperor at the age of 13 after the death of Emperor Severus Alexander. The last of the 6 Emperors in the tumultuous Year of the 6 emperors - the year 238AD in which 6 people had been Roman Emperor. His reign was not long. He died at the age of 19, possibly at Zaitha at the hands of his army, or in battle against the Sassanids. Sol, on the reverse of the coin, was the Roman God of the Sun.…

Gordian III, 238-244 AD, AR Antoninianus, Antioch mint, Sol, struck 242-244 AD

Gordian III became the youngest sole Roman emperor at the age of 13 after the death of Emperor Severus Alexander. The last of the 6 Emperors in the tumultuous Year of the 6 emperors - the year 238AD in which 6 people had been Roman Emperor. His reign was not long. He died at the age of 19, possibly at Zaitha at the hands of his army, or in battle against the Sassanids.…

Gordian III, 238-244 AD, AR Antoninianus, Jupiter, struck 241-243 AD

Gordian III became the youngest sole Roman emperor at the age of 13 after the death of Emperor Severus Alexander. The last of the 6 Emperors in the tumultuous Year of the 6 emperors - the year 238AD in which 6 people had been Roman Emperor. His reign was not long. He died at the age of 19, possibly at Zaitha at the hands of his army, or in battle against the Sassanids.…

Gordian III, 238-244 AD, AR Antoninianus, Sol, struck 241-243 AD

Gordian III became the youngest sole Roman emperor at the age of 13 after the death of Emperor Severus Alexander. The last of the 6 Emperors in the tumultuous Year of the 6 emperors - the year 238AD in which 6 people had been Roman Emperor. His reign was not long. He died at the age of 19, possibly at Zaitha at the hands of his army, or in battle against the Sassanids.…

Gordian III, 238-244 AD, AR Antoninianus, Virtus, struck 240 AD

Gordian III became the youngest sole Roman emperor at the age of 13 after the death of Emperor Severus Alexander. The last of the 6 Emperors in the tumultuous Year of the 6 emperors - the year 238AD in which 6 people had been Roman Emperor. His reign was not long. He died at the age of 19, possibly at Zaitha at the hands of his army, or in battle against the Sassanids.…

Gordian III, 238-244 AD, Pisidia, Antiochia, AE35, She-wolf and twins, struck 240-243 AD

Gordian III became the youngest sole Roman emperor at the age of 13 after the death of Emperor Severus Alexander. The last of the 6 Emperors in the tumultuous Year of the 6 emperors - the year 238AD in which 6 people had been Roman Emperor. His reign was not long. He died at the age of 19, possibly at Zaitha at the hands of his army, or in battle against the Sassanids.…

Gordian III, AR Antoninianus, Sol, 240-243 AD

Gordian III became the youngest sole Roman emperor at the age of 13 after the death of Emperor Severus Alexander. The last of the 6 Emperors in the tumultuous Year of the 6 emperors - the year 238AD in which 6 people had been Roman Emperor. His reign was not long. He died at the age of 19, possibly at Zaitha at the hands of his army, or in battle against the Sassanids.…

Hadrian, 117-138 AD, AE Sestertius, Roma, struck 118 AD

Hadrian was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138 AD. One of the "Five Good Emperors", Hadrian continued to lead the Roman Empire into an era of prosperity.…

Hadrian, AE As, Dacia, 117-138 AD

Scarce coin. Nice green patina. This coin commemorates the visit by the Roman Emperor Hadrian to Dacia. Known for its gold mines, Dacia was conquered by the Roman Emperor Trajan, who expanded the mining operations, making it a strategic acquisition for the Roman Empire.…

Hadrian, AE As, Salus, 124-128 AD

Hadrian was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138 AD. One of the "Five Good Emperors", Hadrian continued to lead the Roman Empire into an era of prosperity. Salus was the Roman Goddess of safety and well-being. According to Volume III of Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, this As was likely minted in 124/5 to 128 AD.…

Hadrian, AR Denarius, Roma, 125-128 AD

Nice toning. Roma is the personification of Rome. Featured on many ancient Roman coins.…

Hadrian, AR Denarius, Victory, 123 AD

Victoria (Victory) is the personification of the goddess of victory. She is the equivalent of Nike, the Greek goddess who is often seen in the hand of Athena on ancient Greek coins.…

Hadrian, Dupondius, Aeternitas, 119-121 AD

Hadrian was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138 AD. One of the "Five Good Emperors", Hadrian continued to lead the Roman Empire into an era of prosperity. Aeternitas was the divine personification of eternity. According to Volume III of Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, this dupondius was minted in 199-120, or 121 AD, during which the following events took place: Second "Liberalitas"; Death and consectration of Matidia; Victories in Britain; The 'Parilia-Natalis Urbis' (21 April); Hadrian leaves Rome and passes by Gaul and Germany to Britain.…

Hadrian, Sestertius, 125-128 A.D.

This coin has a superb portrait of Hadrian. A coin of this quality is rare, especially in the large sestertius size. I have listed the coin reluctantly for sale and at a reluctant price.…

Hadrian, Sestertius, Fortuna, 134-138 AD

Nicely toned. Fortuna was the Roman Goddess of Fate, Chance, Luck and Fortune. A very important deity, she could bring both good and bad luck to the Romans.…

Julia Domna, Augusta, 193-217 AD, AE Sestertius, Juno, struck 211-217 AD, Banti Plate Coin

Julia Domna was the second wife of the Roman Emperor Septimius Severus and the mother of Emperors Geta and Caracalla. Unlike most Empresses, Julia travelled with her husband on military campaigns. She was well respected and credited for supporting Philosophy after Nero had previously banned it. She chose to commit suicide following the asssasination of her son Caracalla during a rebellion.…

Julia Domna, Augusta, 193-217 AD, AR Denarius, Diana, struck 211-215 AD

Julia Domna was the second wife of the Roman Emperor Septimius Severus and the mother of Emperors Geta and Caracalla. Unlike most Empresses, Julia travelled with her husband on military campaigns. She was well respected and credited for supporting Philosophy after Nero had previously banned it. She chose to commit suicide following the asssasination of her son Caracalla during a rebellion.…

Julia Domna, Augusta, 193-217 AD, AR Denarius, Pietas, struck 196-211 AD

Julia Domna was the second wife of the Roman Emperor Septimius Severus and the mother of Emperors Geta and Caracalla. Unlike most Empresses, Julia travelled with her husband on military campaigns. She was well respected and credited for supporting Philosophy after Nero had previously banned it. She chose to commit suicide following the asssasination of her son Caracalla during a rebellion.…

Julia Maesa, Augusta, 218-224/5 AD, Lydia, Sardis, AE Assarion

Julia Maesa was a Roman Empress during the 3rd century AD. She is remembered for plotting and succeeding in restoring the Severan dynasty to the throne. This coin was minted in Sardes, which in antiquity was a city in the Roman province of Lydia.…

Julia Mamaea, 222-235 AD, AR Denarius, Vesta, struck c. 226 AD

Julia Avita Mamaea was the mother of the Roman Emperor Severus Alexander. She served as regent whilst he was a minor. Following the deaths of Caracalla and Elagabalus, Severus Alexander became Roman Emperor. They were both assassinated in 235 AD by mutinous soldiers paving the way for Maximinus Thrax to become Roman Emperor.…

Julian II, the Apostate, 360-363 AD, AR Siliqua, struck 361 AD, from the East Harptree Hoard

Julian II 'the Apostate was Roman Emperor from 361 to 363 AD. The last non-Christian emperor of the Roman Emperor, his attempts to bring back ancient roman values and promote Neoplatonic paganism, meant he was later remembered by name Julian the Apostate.

Description from original listing of coin: CNG is pleased to present a selection of coins from the East Harptree Hoard of 1887. This hoard was discovered near the village of East Harptree, located approximately 16 miles southwest of Bath. The hoard consisted of 1496 silver coins, five silver ingots, and a Roman silver ring set with a carnelian intaglio stone. The coins are 4th century, covering the period of Constantine the Great to Gratian (circa AD 306 to 383). The landowner, Mr. William Kettlewell, made the hoard available to the British Museum, and it was first written up by John Evans in The Numismatic Chronicle of 1888 (pp. 22-46). The British Museum kept 25 of the most interesting coins from the hoard, and the rest of hoard was returned to the owner.

A portion of the hoard, along with the original jug that contained them, was given to a local church for display by William Kettlewell’s son, Colonel Kettlewell. These…

Lydia, Nacrassa, AE24, Pseudo-autonomous Issue, Time of Trajan to the Antonines,  98-161 AD

Nacrasa was located around modern Bakir in North Lydia. It was originally a Seleucid stronghold. However no coinage has been identified from a times prior to it falling under Roman rule. Its coinage includes pseudo-autonomous issues (no emperor portrait) as well as Roman provincial / Greek Imperial issues.…

Lydia, Sala, AE17, Pseudo-autonomous Issue, Time of Antoninus Pius, 138-131 AD

In antiquity, Sala was was an episcopal sees of the Roman province of Lydia.…

Macedon under the Romans, Koinon of Macedon, AE Diassarion, Nero, 50-54 AD

The Roman province of Macedonia was officially established in 146 BC, after the Roman general Quintus Caecilius Metellus defeated Andriscus of Macedon in 148 BC, and after the four client republics established by Rome in the region were dissolved. The province incorporated Epirus Vetus, Thessaly, and parts of Illyria and Thrace. The word "Koinon" means "common" and in this context is used to describe The Koinon of the Macedonians (Κοινόν Μακεδόνων) which was the commonwealth of all Macedonian communities at the time.…

Macrinus, 217-218 AD, Phoenicia, Aradus, AR Tetradrachm, Prieur Plate Coin

Marcus Opellius Severus Macrinus Augustus was Roman Emperor from 217 to 218, reigning jointly with his son Diadumenianus. Originally a praetorian prefect under Emperor Caracalla, he organised the assassination of Caracalla in order to save his own life. His short reign comprising of cleaning up the messes of his predecessor came to an early end when he and his son were both separately assassinated so that the usurper Elagabalus could succeed them as Emperor.…

Macrinus, AE26, Moesia, Nikopolis ad Istrum, Hermes,  217-218 AD

Marcus Opellius Severus Macrinus Augustus was Roman Emperor from 217 to 218, reigning jointly with his son Diadumenianus. Originally a praetorian prefect under Emperor Caracalla, he organised the assassination of Caracalla in order to save his own life. His short reign comprising of cleaning up the messes of his predecessor came to an early end when he and his son were both separately assassinated so that the usurper Elagabalus could succeed them as Emperor.…

Marcus Aurelius, 161-180 AD, Syria, Seleucis and Pieria, Antioch, AE22, SC, struck 151-152 AD, Lindgren Plate Coin

Marcus Aurelius was Roman Emperor from 161 to 180 AD. Known to many as the old Emperor at the beginning of the movie Gladiator, Marcus Aurelius was the last of the Five Good Emperors. Following his death he was succeeded by his son Commodus who is remembered in history for a legacy of eccentricity, cruelty and poor management of the Roman Empire.…

Marcus Aurelius, Dupondius, Boat Reverse, 176-177 AD

Marcus Aurelius was Roman Emperor from 161 to 180 AD. Known to many as the old Emperor at the beginning of the movie Gladiator, Marcus Aurelius was the last of the Five Good Emperors. Following his death he was succeeded by his son Commodus who is remembered in history for a legacy of eccentricity, cruelty and poor management of the Roman Empire. This coin appears to be BMC 1615 ("FELICITI") however reads "FELICITAS" when inspected under magnification. I consider this to be evidence by of a bungled attempt, by a former owner of this coin, to improve the definition of the legend on the reverse. There does not appear to be any Dupondius with 'FELICITAS' in BMC or RIC.…

Mark Antony, Legionary Denarius

Marcus Antonius ('Mark Antony') was born in 83 BC. He was an ally to Julius Caesar and later a rival to Octavius. Following Julius Caesar's assassination, he formed the Second Triumvirate with Octavius and Lepidus. Immortalised in popular culture for his love affair with Cleopatra with whom he jointly committed suicide at Alexandria in 30 BC. These 'Legion' coins were minted most likely at Antony's winter headquarters in Patrae (Greece) to pay his legions and fleet. The name of the legion is on the reverse of the coin. Unfortunately in this example, the coin is too worn to establish which legion it was issued to.…

Mark Antony, Legionary Denarius

Marcus Antonius ('Mark Antony') was born in 83 BC. He was an ally to Julius Caesar and later a rival to Octavius. Following Julius Caesar's assassination, he formed the Second Triumvirate with Octavius and Lepidus. Immortalised in popular culture for his love affair with Cleopatra with whom he jointly committed suicide at Alexandria in 30 BC. These 'Legion' coins were minted most likely at Antony's winter headquarters in Patrae (Greece) to pay his legions and fleet. The name of the legion is on the reverse of the coin. Unfortunately in this example, the coin is too worn to establish which legion it was issued to.…

Maxentius, 306-312 AD, AE Follis, Roma and Emperor in Temple, struck 307 AD

Maxentius (Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maxentius Augustus) was Roman Emperor from 306 to 312. His father was the Roman Emperor Maximian. He was a prolific builder: the great basilica in the forum Romanum and the Circus Maxentius (second in size only to the Circus Maximus) were both built during his reign. He lost the civil war against Licinius and Constantine at the Battle of the Milvian Bridge and is thought to have died by drowning in the Tiber River. After his death, Constantine issued a damnatio memoriae against him. Buildings were renamed after Constantine. Additionally Constantine's propaganda ensured that history represented Maxentius as a cruel and incompetent ruler.…

Maxentius, 306-312 AD, AE Follis, Roma and Emperor in Temple, struck 307 AD

Maxentius (Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maxentius Augustus) was Roman Emperor from 306 to 312. His father was the Roman Emperor Maximian. He was a prolific builder: the great basilica in the forum Romanum and the Circus Maxentius (second in size only to the Circus Maximus) were both built during his reign. He lost the civil war against Licinius and Constantine at the Battle of the Milvian Bridge and is thought to have died by drowning in the Tiber River. After his death, Constantine issued a damnatio memoriae against him. Buildings were renamed after Constantine. Additionally Constantine's propaganda ensured that history represented Maxentius as a cruel and incompetent ruler.…

Maxentius, 306-312 AD, AE Follis, Roma in Temple, struck 307 AD

Maxentius (Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maxentius Augustus) was Roman Emperor from 306 to 312. His father was the Roman Emperor Maximian. He was a prolific builder: the great basilica in the forum Romanum and the Circus Maxentius (second in size only to the Circus Maximus) were both built during his reign. He lost the civil war against Licinius and Constantine at the Battle of the Milvian Bridge and is thought to have died by drowning in the Tiber River. After his death, Constantine issued a damnatio memoriae against him. Buildings were renamed after Constantine. Additionally Constantine's propaganda ensured that history represented Maxentius as a cruel and incompetent ruler.…

Maximinus I, AR Denarius, Salus, AD 235-236

Excellent late portrait of the Roman Emperor Maximinus I on the obverse. This ancient roman coin would make a welcome addition to anyone collecting portraits of each Emperor. Worn dies appear to have been used on the reverse. Maximinus Thrax (otherwise known as Maximinus I) was Roman Emperor from 235 to 238 AD. One of 6 emperors during the Year of the Six Emperors, his short reign was marred by continuous plotting against him. His life was ended at the hands of his own soldiers during the Siege of Aquileia.…

Maximinus I, Sestertius, Fides, 236-237 AD

Maximinus Thrax (otherwise known as Maximinus I) was Roman Emperor from 235 to 238 AD. One of 6 emperors during the Year of the Six Emperors, his short reign was marred by continuous plotting against him. His life was ended at the hands of his own soldiers during the Siege of Aquileia.…

Maximinus II Daia, 308-313AD, Syria, Seleucis and Pieria, Antioch, AE2 Silvered Follis, Genius, struck 312 AD

This coin was struck at the Antioch Mint in Syria, known for producing Roman coins of the fine artistic style

Gaius Valerius Galerius Maximinus Daia Augustus, known as Maximinus II or Maximinus Daia, was Roman Emperor from 308 to 313 AD. Although a nephew to Galerius he was born a peasant but rose to prominence after joining the army. He became Caesar when his uncle adopted him shortly after becoming the eastern Augustus. Known for his persecutions of Christians, his reign came to an end after he was defeated by Licinus in the Civil wars of the Tetrarchy.…

Maximinus II Daia, 308-313AD, Syria, Seleucis and Pieria, Antioch, AE2 Silvered Follis, Genius, struck 312 AD

Gaius Valerius Galerius Maximinus Daia Augustus, known as Maximinus II or Maximinus Daia, was Roman Emperor from 308 to 313 AD. Although a nephew to Galerius he was born a peasant but rose to prominence after joining the army. He became Caesar when his uncle adopted him shortly after becoming the eastern Augustus. Known for his persecutions of Christians, his reign came to an end after he was defeated by Licinus in the Civil wars of the Tetrarchy.…

Nero, 54-68 AD, Ae As, Victory, struck c. 65 AD

Possibly the most infamous of the Roman Emperors, Nero ruled Rome from 54 AD until his death by his own hand in 68 AD. From murdering his mother and other political opponents to (according to rumour) starting the great fires of Rome, the stories about his reign paint a picture of a tyrannical and impulsive Emperor that the people of Rome were glad to see gone. Victoria (Victory) on the reverse of this coin is the personification of the goddess of victory. She is the equivalent of Nike, the Greek goddess who is often seen in the hand of Athena on ancient Greek coins.…

Nero, 54-68 AD, Ae As, Victory, struck c. 65 AD

Possibly the most infamous of the Roman Emperors, Nero ruled Rome from 54 AD until his death by his own hand in 68 AD. From murdering his mother and other political opponents to (according to rumour) starting the great fires of Rome, the stories about his reign paint a picture of a tyrannical and impulsive Emperor that the people of Rome were glad to see gone. Victoria (Victory) on the reverse of this coin is the personification of the goddess of victory. She is the equivalent of Nike, the Greek goddess who is often seen in the hand of Athena on ancient Greek coins.…

Nero, 54-68 AD, Egypt, Alexandria, BI Tetradrachm, Bust of Alexandria, Regnal Year 12 (65-66 AD)

Possibly the most infamous of the Roman Emperors, Nero ruled Rome from 54 AD until his death by his own hand in 68 AD. From murdering his mother and other political opponents to (according to rumour) starting the great fires of Rome, the stories about his reign paint a picture of a tyrannical and impulsive Emperor that the people of Rome were glad to see gone. During Nero's reign, the debasement of Alexandrian coinage followed that of the Roman denarius after the great fire of 64 AD. A large number of billon tetradrachms were minted to replace the existing currency. The silver which was recovered through this process was returned to Rome to mint denarii to fund building programs.…

Nero, 54-68 AD, Egypt, Alexandria, BI Tetradrachm, Bust of Alexandria, Regnal Year 12 (65-66 AD)

Possibly the most infamous of the Roman Emperors, Nero ruled Rome from 54 AD until his death by his own hand in 68 AD. From murdering his mother and other political opponents to (according to rumour) starting the great fires of Rome, the stories about his reign paint a picture of a tyrannical and impulsive Emperor that the people of Rome were glad to see gone. During Nero's reign, the debasement of Alexandrian coinage followed that of the Roman denarius after the great fire of 64 AD. A large number of billon tetradrachms were minted to replace the existing currency. The silver which was recovered through this process was returned to Rome to mint denarii to fund building programs.…

Nero, 54-68 AD, Egypt, Alexandria, BI Tetradrachm, Eagle, Regnal Year 11, 64/65 AD

Possibly the most infamous of the Roman Emperors, Nero ruled Rome from 54 AD until his death by his own hand in 68 AD. From murdering his mother and other political opponents to (according to rumour) starting the great fires of Rome, the stories about his reign paint a picture of a tyrannical and impulsive Emperor that the people of Rome were glad to see gone. During Nero's reign, the debasement of Alexandrian coinage followed that of the Roman denarius after the great fire of 64 AD. A large number of billon tetradrachms were minted to replace the existing currency. The silver which was recovered through this process was returned to Rome to mint denarii to fund building programs.…

Nero, 54-68 AD, Egypt, Alexandria, BI Tetradrachm, Eagle, Regnal Year 11, 64/65 AD

Possibly the most infamous of the Roman Emperors, Nero ruled Rome from 54 AD until his death by his own hand in 68 AD. From murdering his mother and other political opponents to (according to rumour) starting the great fires of Rome, the stories about his reign paint a picture of a tyrannical and impulsive Emperor that the people of Rome were glad to see gone. During Nero's reign, the debasement of Alexandrian coinage followed that of the Roman denarius after the great fire of 64 AD. A large number of billon tetradrachms were minted to replace the existing currency. The silver which was recovered through this process was returned to Rome to mint denarii to fund building programs.…

Nero, 54-68 AD, Egypt, Alexandria, BI Tetradrachm, Serapis, Regnal Year 11, 64/65 AD

Possibly the most infamous of the Roman Emperors, Nero ruled Rome from 54 AD until his death by his own hand in 68 AD. From murdering his mother and other political opponents to (according to rumour) starting the great fires of Rome, the stories about his reign paint a picture of a tyrannical and impulsive Emperor that the people of Rome were glad to see gone. During Nero's reign, the debasement of Alexandrian coinage followed that of the Roman denarius after the great fire of 64 AD. A large number of billon tetradrachms were minted to replace the existing currency. The silver which was recovered through this process was returned to Rome to mint denarii to fund building programs.…

Nero, 54-68 AD, Syria, Seleucis and Pieria, Uncertain Mint, AR Tetradrachm, Divus Claudius, struck c. 63-68 AD

The style and latin legends of these tetradrachms distinguishes them from the well known tetradrachms struck in the Antiochian mints of Syria. Sydenham attributes them to a Caesarean mint in Cappadocia. Butcher proposes that these tetradrachms were minted in Caeesarea for use in Syria. Possibly the most infamous of the Roman Emperors, Nero ruled Rome from 54 AD until his death by his own hand in 68 AD. From murdering his mother and other political opponents to (according to rumour) starting the great fires of Rome, the stories about his reign paint a picture of a tyrannical and impulsive Emperor that the people of Rome were glad to see gone.…

Nero, Ae Dupondius, Victory, 65 AD

A budget priced Nero Dupondius. This coin has been discounted due to the coin showing signs of restorative work to the patina and surfaces, particularly noticeable on the reverse. Despite this it is a pleasing coin overall and a welcome entry into any collection.

Possibly the most infamous of the Roman Emperors, Nero ruled Rome from 54 AD until his death by his own hand in 68 AD. From murdering his mother and other political opponents to (according to rumour) starting the great fires of Rome, the stories about his reign paint a picture of a tyrannical and impulsive Emperor that the people of Rome were glad to see gone. Victoria (Victory) on the reverse of this coin is the personification of the goddess of victory. She is the equivalent of Nike, the Greek goddess who is often seen in the hand of Athena on ancient Greek coins.…

Nero, AR Hemidrachm of Caesarea, Cappadocia, Victory Seated, 54-68 AD

Possibly the most infamous of the Roman Emperors, Nero ruled Rome from 54 AD until his death by his own hand in 68 AD. From murdering his mother and other political opponents to (according to rumour) starting the great fires of Rome, the stories about his reign paint a picture of a tyrannical and impulsive Emperor that the people of Rome were glad to see gone. Victory on the reverse of this coin is the personification of the goddess of victory. She is the equivalent of Nike, the Greek goddess who is often seen in the hand of Athena on ancient Greek coins.…

Nero, AR Hemidrachm of Caesarea, Cappadocia, Victory Standing, Armeniac, 54-68 AD

The reverse of this coin celebrates the victories of the general Gnaeus Domitius Corbulo in the Roman–Parthian War (otherwise known as the War of the Armenian Succession ) of 58–63 AD.

Possibly the most infamous of the Roman Emperors, Nero ruled Rome from 54 AD until his death by his own hand in 68 AD. From murdering his mother and other political opponents to (according to rumour) starting the great fires of Rome, the stories about his reign paint a picture of a tyrannical and impulsive Emperor that the people of Rome were glad to see gone. Victory on the reverse of this coin is the personification of the goddess of victory. She is the equivalent of Nike, the Greek goddess who is often seen in the hand of Athena on ancient Greek coins.…

Nero, Sestertius, Temple of Janus, 64-66 AD

Possibly the most infamous of the Roman Emperors, Nero ruled Rome from 54 AD until his death by his own hand in 68 AD. From murdering his mother and other political opponents to (according to rumour) starting the great fires of Rome, the stories about his reign paint a picture of a tyrannical and impulsive Emperor that the people of Rome were glad to see gone. The Temple of Janus was situated in the Roman Forum, with doors on both ends, known as the Gates of Janus, which would be open during war. Inside the temple was a statue of the Roman god Janus.…

Nerva Ae As

Nerva, 96-98 AD, AE Sestertius, Fortuna, struck 97 AD

Nerva became Roman emperor at the elderly age of 65. His reign lasted only 2 years. He adopted Trajan, then a general, as a heir and his successor. One of the Roman Emperors fortunate enough to die of natural causes, he was succeeded by Trajan, who went on to have a long and prosperous reign.…

Octavius and Divus Julius Caesar, 28-27 BC, Portrait of Julius Caesar

Rare coin from the reign of Octavius featuring a lifelike portrait of Julius Caesar. Countermark on the obverse. An example of an early and presumably effective public relations campaign from a time when Octavius and Mark Antony in direct opposition. Octavius, nephew to Julius Caesar issued coins describing himself as the son of the divine Julius. in doing so he promotes a link between Caesar's divinity and himself. He also emphasises his blood relationship to Julius Caesar and thus his legal claim as his heir.…

Octavius and Divus Julius Caesar, Dupondius, 38 BC, RARE, Portrait of Julius Caesar

Rare coin from the reign of Octavius featuring a lifelike portrait of Julius Caesar. Coin is struck off-centre but otherwise gVF. An example of an early and presumably effective public relations campaign from a time when Octavius and Mark Antony in direct opposition. Octavius, nephew to Julius Caesar issued coins describing himself as the son of the divine Julius. in doing so he promotes a link between Caesar's divinity and himself. He also emphasises his blood relationship to Julius Caesar and thus his legal claim as his heir.…

Otacilia Severa, 244-249 AD, Syria, Seleucis and Pieria, Antioch, AE28, Tyche, struck 244-246 AD

Marcia Otacilia Severa was the wife of Emperor Marcus Julius Philippus. During their reign, Otacilia and her husband were tolerant of Christians, effectively bringing an end to their persecutions by the Romans. Tyche was the Greek goddess of luck who protected the fortune and prosperity of a city.…

Otacilia Severa, 244-249 AD, Syria, Seleucis and Pieria, Antioch, BI Tetradrachm, struck 244 AD

Marcia Otacilia Severa was the wife of Emperor Marcus Julius Philippus. During their reign, Otacilia and her husband were tolerant of Christians, effectively bringing an end to their persecutions by the Romans.…

Otacilia Severa, AR Antoninianus, Concordia, 247 AD

Nicely struck. Some inscription on obverse missing which appears to be minting error, not natural wear. Marcia Otacilia Severa was the wife of Emperor Marcus Julius Philippus. During their reign, Otacilia and her husband were tolerant of Christians, effectively bringing an end to their persecutions by the Romans.…

Otacilia Severa, Sestertius, Concordia, 244-249 AD

Marcia Otacilia Severa was the wife of Emperor Marcus Julius Philippus. During their reign, Otacilia and her husband were tolerant of Christians, effectively bringing an end to their persecutions by the Romans. Concordia was the Roman goddess of harmony.…

Otacilia Severa, Sestertius, Pietas, 244-249 AD

Marcia Otacilia Severa was the wife of Emperor Marcus Julius Philippus. During their reign, Otacilia and her husband were tolerant of Christians, effectively bringing an end to their persecutions by the Romans. Pietas was one of the ancient Roman virtues.…

Philip I and Otacilia Severa, AE26, Mesembria, Thrace, Zeus, 244-249 AD

Marcus Julius Philippus (Philip I) and Marcia Otacilia Severa ruled the Roman Empire from 244 to 249 AD. Remembered in history for their tolerance towards Christianity, their reign came to an end at the hands of Trajan Decius who succeeded Philip I as Roman Emperor.…

Philip I, 244-249 AD, Syria, Seleucis and Pieria, Antioch, AR Tetradrachm, Eagle, Year 1, struck 244 AD

Philip I seized power after the young Roman Emperor Gordian III died under mysterious circumstances. Some claim that he was responsible. His reign was short and marred by financial difficulties from the significant expenditure involved in building the city of Philippopolis, a large payment to the Persians to make peace, as well as payment to his army so the they could support his accession to power. Philip raised taxes significantly whilst at the same time stopped the payment of subsidies north of the Danube which were needed to maintain peace. This led to uprisings. Philip I offered to resign but the senate chose to support him. He sent Trajan Decius to deal with the rising discontent. Instead Decius betrayed him. He was proclaimed emperor by the Danubian armies and marched on Rome. Battle was fought outside of Rome near modern day Verona. Decius won the battle and Philip was killed shortly thereafter, either in battle, or by his own soldiers.…

Philip I, AR Antoninianus, Fides, 244-247 AD

Superb portrait. Almost no wear on coin despite its ancient age. Marcus Julius Philippus was Roman Emperor from 244 to 249 AD. Sympathetic to Christians it has been claimed by some that he was a Christian himself, which if true, would make him the first Christian Roman Emperor. Born in modern day Syria he was commonly referred to as Philip the Arab.…

Philip II, 247–249 AD, Syria, Seleucis and Pieria, Antioch, AR Tetradrachm, front-facing bust, struck 248-249 AD

Marcus Julius Philippus Severus (also known as Philippus II, Philip II and Philip the Younger) was the son of the Roman Emperor Philip I ("the Arab"). Later, he became Consul and then Augustus and co-ruler with his father. Philip II who never made it past his 12th year dying in his mother's arms, murdered by the Praetorian guard on learning of his father's death in battle to Trajan Decius.…

Philip II, 247–249 AD, Syria, Seleucis and Pieria, Antioch, AR Tetradrachm, struck 248-249 AD

Marcus Julius Philippus Severus (also known as Philippus II, Philip II and Philip the Younger) was the son of the Roman Emperor Philip I ("the Arab"). Later, he became Consul and then Augustus and co-ruler with his father. Philip II who never made it past his 12th year dying in his mother's arms, murdered by the Praetorian guard on learning of his father's death in battle to Trajan Decius.…

Philip II, 247–249 AD, Syria, Seleucis and Pieria, Antioch, BI Tetradrachm, struck 248-249 AD

Marcus Julius Philippus Severus (also known as Philippus II, Philip II and Philip the Younger) was the son of the Roman Emperor Philip I ("the Arab"). Later, he became Consul and then Augustus and co-ruler with his father. Philip II who never made it past his 12th year dying in his mother's arms, murdered by the Praetorian guard on learning of his father's death in battle to Trajan Decius.…

Philip II, AE28 of Markianopolis, Moesia Inferior, Nemesis, 247-249 AD

Marcus Julius Philippus Severus (also known as Philippus II, Philip II and Philip the Younger) was the son of the Roman Emperor Philip I ("the Arab"). Later, he became Consul and then Augustus and co-ruler with his father. Philip II lived a short life. He died in his mother's arms at only 12 years of age, murdered by the Praetorian guard on learning of his father's death in battle to Trajan Decius.…

Philip II, Sestertius, Principi Ivvent, 247-249 AD

Marcus Julius Philippus Severus (also known as Philippus II, Philip II and Philip the Younger) was the son of the Roman Emperor Philip I ("the Arab"). Later, he became Consul and then Augustus and co-ruler with his father. The legend on the reverse of this coin is "Principi Ivvent" which translated, means "the Prince of Youth". This is an accurate description for Philip II who never made it past his 12th year dying in his mother's arms, murdered by the Praetorian guard on learning of his father's death in battle to Trajan Decius.…

Probus, 276-282 AD, Silvered Antoninianus, Adventus, struck 279 AD

Probus was a military Emperor. On reaching adulthood he joined the military where he proved himself capable, enough so that he was later appointed governor of the East by the emperor Tacitus. When Tacitus died, Probus was proclaimed emperor by his soldiers. During his reign, he was successful in his campaigns in Gaul and in strengthening the Rhine and Danube frontier against the Germanic tribes.…

Probus, 276-282 AD, Silvered Antoninianus, Concordia Militum, struck 280 AD

Probus was a military Emperor. On reaching adulthood he joined the military where he proved himself capable, enough so that he was later appointed governor of the East by the emperor Tacitus. When Tacitus died, Probus was proclaimed emperor by his soldiers. During his reign, he was successful in his campaigns in Gaul and in strengthening the Rhine and Danube frontier against the Germanic tribes.…

Probus, 276-282 AD, Silvered Antoninianus, Fides Militum, struck 281 AD

Probus was a military Emperor. On reaching adulthood he joined the military where he proved himself capable, enough so that he was later appointed governor of the East by the emperor Tacitus. When Tacitus died, Probus was proclaimed emperor by his soldiers. During his reign, he was successful in his campaigns in Gaul and in strengthening the Rhine and Danube frontier against the Germanic tribes.…

Probus, 276-282 AD, Silvered Antoninianus, Salus, struck 280-282 AD

Probus was a military Emperor. On reaching adulthood he joined the military where he proved himself capable, enough so that he was later appointed governor of the East by the emperor Tacitus. When Tacitus died, Probus was proclaimed emperor by his soldiers. During his reign, he was successful in his campaigns in Gaul and in strengthening the Rhine and Danube frontier against the Germanic tribes.…

Probus, 276-282 AD, Silvered Antoninianus, Sol in Quadriga, AHB, struck 280 AD

Probus was a military Emperor. On reaching adulthood he joined the military where he proved himself capable, enough so that he was later appointed governor of the East by the emperor Tacitus. When Tacitus died, Probus was proclaimed emperor by his soldiers. During his reign, he was successful in his campaigns in Gaul and in strengthening the Rhine and Danube frontier against the Germanic tribes.…

Probus, 276-282 AD, Silvered Antoninianus, Sol in Quadriga, XXI, struck 280 AD

Probus was a military Emperor. On reaching adulthood he joined the military where he proved himself capable, enough so that he was later appointed governor of the East by the emperor Tacitus. When Tacitus died, Probus was proclaimed emperor by his soldiers. During his reign, he was successful in his campaigns in Gaul and in strengthening the Rhine and Danube frontier against the Germanic tribes.…

Probus, 276-282 AD, Silvered Antoninianus, Sol in Quadriga, XXIQ, struck 280 AD

Probus was a military Emperor. On reaching adulthood he joined the military where he proved himself capable, enough so that he was later appointed governor of the East by the emperor Tacitus. When Tacitus died, Probus was proclaimed emperor by his soldiers. During his reign, he was successful in his campaigns in Gaul and in strengthening the Rhine and Danube frontier against the Germanic tribes.…

Probus, 276-282 AD, Silvered Antoninianus, Sol in Quadriga, XXIQ, struck 280 AD

Probus was a military Emperor. On reaching adulthood he joined the military where he proved himself capable, enough so that he was later appointed governor of the East by the emperor Tacitus. When Tacitus died, Probus was proclaimed emperor by his soldiers. During his reign, he was successful in his campaigns in Gaul and in strengthening the Rhine and Danube frontier against the Germanic tribes.…

Probus, 276-282 AD, Silvered Antoninianus, Sol in Quadriga, XXIQ, struck 280 AD

Probus was a military Emperor. On reaching adulthood he joined the military where he proved himself capable, enough so that he was later appointed governor of the East by the emperor Tacitus. When Tacitus died, Probus was proclaimed emperor by his soldiers. During his reign, he was successful in his campaigns in Gaul and in strengthening the Rhine and Danube frontier against the Germanic tribes.…

Probus, 276-282 AD, Silvered Antoninianus, Sol in Quadriga, XXIS, struck 280 AD

Probus was a military Emperor. On reaching adulthood he joined the military where he proved himself capable, enough so that he was later appointed governor of the East by the emperor Tacitus. When Tacitus died, Probus was proclaimed emperor by his soldiers. During his reign, he was successful in his campaigns in Gaul and in strengthening the Rhine and Danube frontier against the Germanic tribes.…

Probus, 276-282 AD, Silvered Antoninianus, Sol in Quadriga, XXIS, struck 280 AD, almost Uncirculated

Probus was a military Emperor. On reaching adulthood he joined the military where he proved himself capable, enough so that he was later appointed governor of the East by the emperor Tacitus. When Tacitus died, Probus was proclaimed emperor by his soldiers. During his reign, he was successful in his campaigns in Gaul and in strengthening the Rhine and Danube frontier against the Germanic tribes.…

Probus, 276-282 AD, Silvered Antoninianus, Sol in Quadriga, XXIT, struck 280 AD

Probus was a military Emperor. On reaching adulthood he joined the military where he proved himself capable, enough so that he was later appointed governor of the East by the emperor Tacitus. When Tacitus died, Probus was proclaimed emperor by his soldiers. During his reign, he was successful in his campaigns in Gaul and in strengthening the Rhine and Danube frontier against the Germanic tribes.…

Probus, 276-282 AD, Silvered Antoninianus, Sol in Quadriga, XXIΓ, struck 280 AD

Probus was a military Emperor. On reaching adulthood he joined the military where he proved himself capable, enough so that he was later appointed governor of the East by the emperor Tacitus. When Tacitus died, Probus was proclaimed emperor by his soldiers. During his reign, he was successful in his campaigns in Gaul and in strengthening the Rhine and Danube frontier against the Germanic tribes.…

Probus, 276-282 AD, Silvered Antoninianus, Virtus, struck 277 AD

Probus was a military Emperor. On reaching adulthood he joined the military where he proved himself capable, enough so that he was later appointed governor of the East by the emperor Tacitus. When Tacitus died, Probus was proclaimed emperor by his soldiers. During his reign, he was successful in his campaigns in Gaul and in strengthening the Rhine and Danube frontier against the Germanic tribes.…

Pupienus, 238 AD, AE Sestertius, Pax Republica, struck April-July 238 AD

Pupienus (Marcus Clodius Pupienus Maximus Augustus) jointly ruled with Balbinus as Roman Emperor for just three months in 238 AD, during the tumultuous 'Year of the Six Emperors'. The reverse legend PAX PVBLICA translates as 'peace for the public'.…

Roman Imperational, Brutus, AR Quinarius, 43-42 BC

Marcus Junius Brutus (the Younger) is infamous in history for betraying Julius Caesar and taking a leading role in his assassination. The infamy of his betrayal is rivalled only by Judas. His father, Marcus Juinius Brutus Maior, was killed by Pompey. His mother, Servilla, in earlier times, was the mistress of Julius Caesar. Brutus and Caesar enjoyed a close relationship during that time. In the Battle of Pharsalus, he sided with Pompey against Caesar. On defeat and on his surrender, Caesar showed him leniency and forgave him, reportedly out of some concern he may be his biological father. He then became part of Caesar’s inner circle. When a group of Roman senators grew concerned about Caesar’s growing power, they recruited Brutus to their cause. They eventually assassinating Julius Caesar in the Roman Senate on 15 March 44 BC (the ‘Ides of March’). Brutus fled to Greece, during which time this coin was minted. Shortly afterwards, upon losing the Battle of Philippi to Mark Antony and Octavian, he committed suicide.…

Roman Imperational, Julius Caesar, as Dictator, 49-44 BC, AR Denarius, 'the coin that killed Caesar', struck February-March 44 BC, Banti Plate Coin

This coin, issued by the moneyer P. Sepullius Macer, belonging to a series of coins issued just before the assassination of Julius Caesar on 15 March 44 BC (the 'Ides of March'). These coins broke with Roman tradition by featuring the face of a living roman. In this way, Julius Caesar is shown as a king. The legend 'DICT PERPETVO' translates literally as 'Dictator in Perpetuity' proclaiming himself as ruler of the Roman Empire for life. His veil most likely represents his position as Pontifex Maximus, the highest religious post. The coins were issued hastily, as evidenced by their less refined style and often off-centre strikes, to fund an upcoming war with Parthia. In the eyes of the Senate, these coins showed that Caesar had gone too far.…

Roman Imperational, Julius Caesar, as Dictator, AR Denarius, 49-44 BC, 'the coin that killed Caesar', struck February-March 44 BC

This coin, issued by the moneyer P. Sepullius Macer, belonging to a series of coins issued just before the assassination of Julius Caesar on 15 March 44 BC (the 'Ides of March'). These coins broke with Roman tradition by featuring the face of a living roman. In this way, Julius Caesar is shown as a king. The legend 'DICT PERPETVO' translates literally as 'Dictator in Perpetuity' proclaiming himself as ruler of the Roman Empire for life. His veil most likely represents his position as Pontifex Maximus, the highest religious post. The coins were issued hastily, as evidenced by their less refined style and often off-centre strikes, to fund an upcoming war with Parthia. In the eyes of the Senate, these coins showed that Caesar had gone too far.…

Roman Imperational, Mark Antony and Octavia, AR Cistophoric Tetradrachm, 39 BC

These cistophoric tetradrachms (or medallions) commemorate the recent marriage of Antony and Octavia which took place after the treaty of Brundusium in 40 BC. The reverse features the cista mystica, whcih was a basket used for housing sacred snakes in connection with the initiation ceremony into the cult of Bacchus (Dionysus).…

Roman Imperational, Mark Antony, AR Legionary Denarius, 32-31 BC

These legionary denarii were issued by Mark Antony before the Battle of Actium in 32 BC to pay his legions and fleet. LEC VI ('C' for G on this coin) on the reverse efers to Legio VI, the Sixth Ironclad Legion which fought with him in Cisalpine Gaul and against Pompey at the Battle of Pharsalus in 48 BC. The obverse reads ANT AVG (‘C’ for G) abbreviating Antonius augurs, to identify the position he held as College of Augur. III VIR R P C abbreviates Triumvir republican constituendae, meaning one of the men of the three men for the restoration of the republic, referring to his membership of the Second Trimvirate together with Octavian and Lepidus.…

Roman Provincial Coin: Septimius Severus

Roman Provincial coin of Septimus Severus issued under the Magistrate Julius Faustinianus. Nice apple-green patina.…

Roman Republic, Anonymous, AR Quadrigatus or Didrachm, c. 225-214 BC

The quadrigatus was issued by the Roman Republic during the 3rd century BC before the standardisation of the denarius. On the obverse is Janus, the god of beginnings and endings. He is represented as having two faces in opposite directions, one looking into the future, the other looking into the past. On the reverse, is Jupiter, the king of the gods, and the equivalent of the greek god Zeus. He is shown riding on a quadriga, a chariot driven by four hourses, for which this coin derives its name.…

Roman Republic, Brutus, AR Denarius, 54 BC

Marcus Junius Brutus (the Younger) is infamous in history for betraying Julius Caesar and taking a leading role in his assassination. The infamy of his betrayal is rivalled only by Judas. His father, Marcus Juinius Brutus Maior, was killed by Pompey. His mother, Servilla, in earlier times, was the mistress of Julius Caesar. Brutus and Caesar enjoyed a close relationship during that time. In the Battle of Pharsalus, he sided with Pompey against Caesar. On defeat and on his surrender, Caesar showed him leniency and forgave him, reportedly out of some concern he may be his biological father. He then became part of Caesar’s inner circle. When a group of Roman senators grew concerned about Caesar’s growing power, they recruited Brutus to their cause. They eventually assassinating Julius Caesar in the Roman Senate on 15 March 44 BC (the ‘Ides of March’). The obverse of this coin shows his ancestor, Lucius Junius Brutus, the founder of the Roman Republic. On the reverse is Gaius Servilius Structus Ahala, a 5th century politician who is reputed to have saved Rome from Spurius Maelius by assassinating him with a dagger.…

Roman Republic, C. Vibius C. f. Pansa, Moneyer, AR Denarius, 90 BC

"This moneyer was probably the father of C. Tibius C. f. C. n. Pansa, who was consul B.C. 43, and who himself struck coins in B.C. 49, adopting for some of them the types used by his father. Of C. Vibius Pansa, the moneyer of B.C. 87, not much is known beyond what we can gather from his coins. He was proscribed by Sulla in B.C. 82, which may have caused his son to espouse the side of Julius Caesar, of whom he was always a faithful adherent. On account of the interchange of types on their coins Quintus Titius and C. Vibius Pansa were evidently colleagues at the mint." [Grueber, H. Coins of the Roman Republic in The British Museum. (London, 1910), p. 289 n. 2]…

Roman Republic, P. Clodius M.f. Turrinus, Moneyer, AR Denarius, 42 BC

Almost nothing is known of Publius Clodius, son of Marcus Clodius, other that he was one of a quattuorvirate of the mint. That quattuorvirate, comprising L. Livineius Regulus, P. Clodius, L. Mussidius Longus, and C. Vibius Varus was appointed by the second triumvirate, the political alliance of Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus, Marcus Antonius, and Marcus Aemilius Lepidus.…

Septimius Severus, 193-211 AD, AE25, Coele-Syria, Heliopolis, Temple of Jupiter

The reverse legend of the coin, IOMH is abbreviation for 'Jovi Optimo Maximo Helipolitano', the Temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus Helipolitanus, the largest temple in Roman times. It was dedicated to the Roman Zeus, and more specifically, the epithet known as Jupiter Optimus Maximus Heliopolitanus. It served as an oracle in ancient times, notably predicting that the emperor Trajan would not return from his expedition against the Parthian Empire.…

Septimius Severus, 193-211 AD, AR Denarius, Emperor Sacrificing, struck c. 200-201 AD

Restitvtor Vrbis ('Restititor Urbis'), meaning 'Restorer of Rome' symbolises the rebuilding by Septimius of his capital. Septimius Severus, became Roman Emperor in 193 AD after the death of Emperor Pertinax during the Year of the Five Emperors. During his reign he successfully consolidated Rome's power and wagered successful campaigns against the Parthian Empire, and in Africa and Mauritania. After falling ill and dying in 211 AD, he was succeeded by his sons, forming what is now referred to as the Severan Dynasty.…

Septimius Severus, 193-211 AD, AR Denarius, Neptune, struck 210 AD

Restitvtor Vrbis ('Restititor Urbis'), meaning 'Restorer of Rome' symbolises the rebuilding by Septimius of his capital. Septimius Severus, became Roman Emperor in 193 AD after the death of Emperor Pertinax during the Year of the Five Emperors. During his reign he successfully consolidated Rome's power and wagered successful campaigns against the Parthian Empire, and in Africa and Mauritania. After falling ill and dying in 211 AD, he was succeeded by his sons, forming what is now referred to as the Severan Dynasty.…

Septimius Severus, 193-211 AD, AR Denarius, Roma, struck c. 209 AD

Restitvtor Vrbis ('Restititor Urbis'), meaning 'Restorer of Rome' symbolises the rebuilding by Septimius of his capital. Septimius Severus, became Roman Emperor in 193 AD after the death of Emperor Pertinax during the Year of the Five Emperors. During his reign he successfully consolidated Rome's power and wagered successful campaigns against the Parthian Empire, and in Africa and Mauritania. After falling ill and dying in 211 AD, he was succeeded by his sons, forming what is now referred to as the Severan Dynasty.…

Septimus Severus, Marcianopolis, Moesia Inferior, 193 - 211 AD

Roman Provincial coin of Septimus Severus from Marcinaopolis, Moesia Inferior. Excellent condition. Very nice green patina with smooth surfaces.…

Severus Alexander, 222-235 AD, AE Sestertius, Emperor in Military Dress, struck 230 AD

Severus Alexander was Roman Emperor from 222 to 235 AD. He was the last emperor of the Severan dynasty. His death marked the beginning of the Crisis of the Third Century, during which the Roman Empire would almost crumble. He was assassinated in 235 AD by mutinous soldiers paving the way for Maximus to become Roman Emperor. The reverse legend, VIRTVS AVG, translates as 'valour of the Emperor'.…

Severus Alexander, 222-235 AD, AE Sestertius, Mars, struck 232 AD

Severus Alexander was Roman Emperor from 222 to 235 AD. He was the last emperor of the Severan dynasty. His death marked the beginning of the Crisis of the Third Century, during which the Roman Empire would almost crumble. He was assassinated in 235 AD by mutinous soldiers paving the way for Maximus to become Roman Emperor. This coin was issued late into his reign by which stage he had developed a fully grown beard. The reverse legend, MARS VLTOR, translates to 'Mars the Avenger' the cult of which was earlier established by the Roman Emperor Augustus.…

Severus Alexander, 222-235 AD, AE Sestertius, Mars, struck 232 AD

Severus Alexander was Roman Emperor from 222 to 235 AD. He was the last emperor of the Severan dynasty. His death marked the beginning of the Crisis of the Third Century, during which the Roman Empire would almost crumble. He was assassinated in 235 AD by mutinous soldiers paving the way for Maximus to become Roman Emperor. This coin was issued late into his reign by which stage he had developed a fully grown beard. The reverse legend, MARS VLTOR, translates to 'Mars the Avenger' the cult of which was earlier established by the Roman Emperor Augustus.…

Severus Alexander, 222-235 AD, AE Sestertius, Mars, struck 232 AD

Severus Alexander was Roman Emperor from 222 to 235 AD. He was the last emperor of the Severan dynasty. His death marked the beginning of the Crisis of the Third Century, during which the Roman Empire would almost crumble. He was assassinated in 235 AD by mutinous soldiers paving the way for Maximus to become Roman Emperor. This coin was issued late into his reign by which stage he had developed a fully grown beard. The reverse legend, MARS VLTOR, translates to 'Mars the Avenger' the cult of which was earlier established by the Roman Emperor Augustus.…

Severus Alexander, 222-235 AD, AE Sestertius, Mars, struck 232 AD

Severus Alexander was Roman Emperor from 222 to 235 AD. He was the last emperor of the Severan dynasty. His death marked the beginning of the Crisis of the Third Century, during which the Roman Empire would almost crumble. He was assassinated in 235 AD by mutinous soldiers paving the way for Maximus to become Roman Emperor. This coin was issued late into his reign by which stage he had developed a fully grown beard. The reverse legend, MARS VLTOR, translates to 'Mars the Avenger' the cult of which was earlier established by the Roman Emperor Augustus.…

Severus Alexander, 222-235 AD, AE Sestertius, Mars, struck 232 AD

Severus Alexander was Roman Emperor from 222 to 235 AD. He was the last emperor of the Severan dynasty. His death marked the beginning of the Crisis of the Third Century, during which the Roman Empire would almost crumble. He was assassinated in 235 AD by mutinous soldiers paving the way for Maximus to become Roman Emperor. This coin was issued late into his reign by which stage he had developed a fully grown beard. The reverse legend, MARS VLTOR, translates to 'Mars the Avenger' the cult of which was earlier established by the Roman Emperor Augustus.…

Severus Alexander, 222-235 AD, AE Sestertius, Mars, struck 232 AD

Severus Alexander was Roman Emperor from 222 to 235 AD. He was the last emperor of the Severan dynasty. His death marked the beginning of the Crisis of the Third Century, during which the Roman Empire would almost crumble. He was assassinated in 235 AD by mutinous soldiers paving the way for Maximus to become Roman Emperor. This coin was issued late into his reign by which stage he had developed a fully grown beard. The reverse legend, MARS VLTOR, translates to 'Mars the Avenger' the cult of which was earlier established by the Roman Emperor Augustus.…

Severus Alexander, 222-235 AD, AE Sestertius, Mars, struck 232 AD

Severus Alexander was Roman Emperor from 222 to 235 AD. He was the last emperor of the Severan dynasty. His death marked the beginning of the Crisis of the Third Century, during which the Roman Empire would almost crumble. He was assassinated in 235 AD by mutinous soldiers paving the way for Maximus to become Roman Emperor. This coin was issued late into his reign by which stage he had developed a fully grown beard. The reverse legend, MARS VLTOR, translates to 'Mars the Avenger' the cult of which was earlier established by the Roman Emperor Augustus.…

Severus Alexander, 222-235 AD, AE Sestertius, Mars, struck 232 AD

Severus Alexander was Roman Emperor from 222 to 235 AD. He was the last emperor of the Severan dynasty. His death marked the beginning of the Crisis of the Third Century, during which the Roman Empire would almost crumble. He was assassinated in 235 AD by mutinous soldiers paving the way for Maximus to become Roman Emperor. This coin was issued late into his reign by which stage he had developed a fully grown beard. The reverse legend, MARS VLTOR, translates to 'Mars the Avenger' the cult of which was earlier established by the Roman Emperor Augustus.…

Severus Alexander, 222-235 AD, AE Sestertius, Mars, struck 232 AD

Severus Alexander was Roman Emperor from 222 to 235 AD. He was the last emperor of the Severan dynasty. His death marked the beginning of the Crisis of the Third Century, during which the Roman Empire would almost crumble. He was assassinated in 235 AD by mutinous soldiers paving the way for Maximus to become Roman Emperor. This coin was issued late into his reign by which stage he had developed a fully grown beard. The reverse legend, MARS VLTOR, translates to 'Mars the Avenger' the cult of which was earlier established by the Roman Emperor Augustus.…

Severus Alexander, 222-235 AD, AE Sestertius, Providentia, struck 232 AD

Severus Alexander was Roman Emperor from 222 to 235 AD. He was the last emperor of the Severan dynasty. His death marked the beginning of the Crisis of the Third Century, during which the Roman Empire would almost crumble. He was assassinated in 235 AD by mutinous soldiers paving the way for Maximus to become Roman Emperor. This coin was issued late into his reign by which stage he had developed a fully grown beard. Derived from the word 'providere' (to foresee), Providentia is the divine personification of foresight and making provision. Its use on coinage was to show that the emperor could foresee the needs of his empire and provide for his people.…

Severus Alexander, 222-235 AD, AE Sestertius, Providentia, struck 232 AD

Severus Alexander was Roman Emperor from 222 to 235 AD. He was the last emperor of the Severan dynasty. His death marked the beginning of the Crisis of the Third Century, during which the Roman Empire would almost crumble. He was assassinated in 235 AD by mutinous soldiers paving the way for Maximus to become Roman Emperor. This coin was issued late into his reign by which stage he had developed a fully grown beard. Derived from the word 'providere' (to foresee), Providentia is the divine personification of foresight and making provision. Its use on coinage was to show that the emperor could foresee the needs of his empire and provide for his people.…

Severus Alexander, 222-235 AD, AE Sestertius, Providentia, struck 232 AD

Severus Alexander was Roman Emperor from 222 to 235 AD. He was the last emperor of the Severan dynasty. His death marked the beginning of the Crisis of the Third Century, during which the Roman Empire would almost crumble. He was assassinated in 235 AD by mutinous soldiers paving the way for Maximus to become Roman Emperor. This coin was issued late into his reign by which stage he had developed a fully grown beard. Derived from the word 'providere' (to foresee), Providentia is the divine personification of foresight and making provision. Its use on coinage was to show that the emperor could foresee the needs of his empire and provide for his people.…

Severus Alexander, 222-235 AD, AE Sestertius, Providentia, struck 232 AD

Severus Alexander was Roman Emperor from 222 to 235 AD. He was the last emperor of the Severan dynasty. His death marked the beginning of the Crisis of the Third Century, during which the Roman Empire would almost crumble. He was assassinated in 235 AD by mutinous soldiers paving the way for Maximus to become Roman Emperor. This coin was issued late into his reign by which stage he had developed a fully grown beard. Derived from the word 'providere' (to foresee), Providentia is the divine personification of foresight and making provision. Its use on coinage was to show that the emperor could foresee the needs of his empire and provide for his people.…

Severus Alexander, 222-235 AD, AE Sestertius, Providentia, struck 232 AD

Severus Alexander was Roman Emperor from 222 to 235 AD. He was the last emperor of the Severan dynasty. His death marked the beginning of the Crisis of the Third Century, during which the Roman Empire would almost crumble. He was assassinated in 235 AD by mutinous soldiers paving the way for Maximus to become Roman Emperor. This coin was issued late into his reign by which stage he had developed a fully grown beard. Derived from the word 'providere' (to foresee), Providentia is the divine personification of foresight and making provision. Its use on coinage was to show that the emperor could foresee the needs of his empire and provide for his people.…

Severus Alexander, 222-235 AD, AE Sestertius, Providentia, struck 232 AD

Severus Alexander was Roman Emperor from 222 to 235 AD. He was the last emperor of the Severan dynasty. His death marked the beginning of the Crisis of the Third Century, during which the Roman Empire would almost crumble. He was assassinated in 235 AD by mutinous soldiers paving the way for Maximus to become Roman Emperor. This coin was issued late into his reign by which stage he had developed a fully grown beard. Derived from the word 'providere' (to foresee), Providentia is the divine personification of foresight and making provision. Its use on coinage was to show that the emperor could foresee the needs of his empire and provide for his people.…

Severus Alexander, 222-235 AD, AE Sestertius, Providentia, struck 232 AD

Severus Alexander was Roman Emperor from 222 to 235 AD. He was the last emperor of the Severan dynasty. His death marked the beginning of the Crisis of the Third Century, during which the Roman Empire would almost crumble. He was assassinated in 235 AD by mutinous soldiers paving the way for Maximus to become Roman Emperor. This coin was issued late into his reign by which stage he had developed a fully grown beard. Derived from the word 'providere' (to foresee), Providentia is the divine personification of foresight and making provision. Its use on coinage was to show that the emperor could foresee the needs of his empire and provide for his people.…

Severus Alexander, 222-235 AD, AE Sestertius, Providentia, struck 232 AD

Severus Alexander was Roman Emperor from 222 to 235 AD. He was the last emperor of the Severan dynasty. His death marked the beginning of the Crisis of the Third Century, during which the Roman Empire would almost crumble. He was assassinated in 235 AD by mutinous soldiers paving the way for Maximus to become Roman Emperor. This coin was issued late into his reign by which stage he had developed a fully grown beard. Derived from the word 'providere' (to foresee), Providentia is the divine personification of foresight and making provision. Its use on coinage was to show that the emperor could foresee the needs of his empire and provide for his people.…

Severus Alexander, 222-235 AD, AE Sestertius, Providentia, struck 232 AD

Severus Alexander was Roman Emperor from 222 to 235 AD. He was the last emperor of the Severan dynasty. His death marked the beginning of the Crisis of the Third Century, during which the Roman Empire would almost crumble. He was assassinated in 235 AD by mutinous soldiers paving the way for Maximus to become Roman Emperor. This coin was issued late into his reign by which stage he had developed a fully grown beard. Derived from the word 'providere' (to foresee), Providentia is the divine personification of foresight and making provision. Its use on coinage was to show that the emperor could foresee the needs of his empire and provide for his people.…

Severus Alexander, 222-235 AD, AE Sestertius, Providentia, struck 232 AD

Severus Alexander was Roman Emperor from 222 to 235 AD. He was the last emperor of the Severan dynasty. His death marked the beginning of the Crisis of the Third Century, during which the Roman Empire would almost crumble. He was assassinated in 235 AD by mutinous soldiers paving the way for Maximus to become Roman Emperor. This coin was issued late into his reign by which stage he had developed a fully grown beard. Derived from the word 'providere' (to foresee), Providentia is the divine personification of foresight and making provision. Its use on coinage was to show that the emperor could foresee the needs of his empire and provide for his people.…

Severus Alexander, 222-235 AD, AR Denarius, Mars, struck 227 AD

Severus Alexander was Roman Emperor from 222 to 235. He was the last emperor of the Severan dynasty. His death marked the beginning of the Crisis of the Third Century, during which the Roman Empire would almost crumble. He was assassinated in 235 by mutinous soldiers paving the way for Maximus to become Roman Emperor.…

Severus Alexander, 222-235 AD, Cilicia, Mallus, AE Medallion, struck 225-230 AD

Severus Alexander was Roman Emperor from 222 to 235 AD. He was the last emperor of the Severan dynasty. His death marked the beginning of the Crisis of the Third Century, during which the Roman Empire would almost crumble. He was assassinated in 235 AD by mutinous soldiers paving the way for Maximus to become Roman Emperor.…

Severus Alexander, AR Denarius, Emperor Reverse, 226 AD

Severus Alexander was Roman Emperor from 222 to 235. He was the last emperor of the Severan dynasty. His death marked the beginning of the Crisis of the Third Century, during which the Roman Empire would almost crumble. He was assassinated in 235 by mutinous soldiers paving the way for Maximus to become Roman Emperor.…

Theodosius I, AE3, Antioch Mint, 379-395 AD

Theodosius I "the Great" was the last Roman Emperor to rule the eastern and western halves of the Roman Empire. A Christian Emperor, he issued the decrees making Nicene Christianity the official state decrees that effectively made Orthodox Nicene Christianity the sole authorised religion.…

Theodosius I, AE4, 379-395 AD, Mint Error, Overstrike

Theodosius I "the Great" was the last Roman Emperor to rule the eastern and western halves of the Roman Empire. A Christian Emperor, he issued the decrees making Nicene Christianity the official state decrees that effectively made Orthodox Nicene Christianity the sole authorised religion.…

Trajan Decius, 249-251 AD, Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria, AE31, Temple

From the famous mint at Antioch which has produced some of the most lifelike portraits of the Roman Emperors. His reign lasting only 2 years, Trajan Decius was the first Roman Emperor to to die in battle against a foreign enemy, during the Battle of Abritus.…

Trajan Decius, 249-251 AD, Syria, Seleucis and Pieria, Antioch, BI Tetradrachm, Eagle

Billion Tetradrachm. Multi-coloured patina. 3 pellets visible behind bust, however possible it is 4 as area adjacent is encrusted. From the famous mint at Antioch which has produced some of the most lifelike portraits of the Roman Emperors. His reign lasting only 2 eyars, Trajan Decius was the first Roman Emperor to to die in battle against a foreign enemy, during the Battle of Abritus.…

Trajan Decius, 249-251 AD, Syria, Seleucis and Pieria, Antioch, BI Tetradrachm, Eagle, struck  249-251 AD

Trajan Decius was Roman Emperor for only 2 short years. His is remembered for starting an empire-wide persecution of Christians through the issuing of an edict ordering everyone to perform a sacrifice to the Roman gods and the well-being of the Emperor. Also notably, he was the first Roman Emperor to to die in battle against a foreign enemy, during the Battle of Abritus.…

Trajan Dupondius

A nice dupondius of Trajan with an interesting reverse.…

Trajan Dupondius, Spes, 103 AD

Sharply struck obverse with well defined features in the portrait. Similar for reverse, with full details in drapery of Spes visible. Dark green surfaces. Trajan was one of the greatest Roman Emperors. A former soldier, he expanded the Roman Empire to its largest size in history. A philanthropist who invested in social welfare and public building programs, he is known as the second of the Five Good Emperors.…

Trajan Sestertius, Excellent Portrait, 98 -117 AD

A beautiful Sestertius of Marcus Ulpius Traianus. Trajan was a brilliant emperor and Rome reached its largest (geographically) under his reign. Features a gradient-like dark green/light green patina.…

Trajan, 98-117 AD, AE Sestertius, Dacian, struck c. 103-111 AD

Trajan was one of the greatest Roman Emperors. A former soldier, he expanded the Roman Empire to its largest size in history. A philanthropist who invested in social welfare and public building programs, he is known as the second of the Five Good Emperors.…

Trajan, 98-117 AD, AR Denarius, Concordia, struck 98-99 AD

Trajan was one of the greatest Roman Emperors. A former soldier, he expanded the Roman Empire to its largest size in history. A philanthropist who invested in social welfare and public building programs, he is known as the second of the Five Good Emperors. This coin was part of the first emissions of coinage when Trajan became Emperor. The COS II in the obverse legend denotes Trajan's second consulship: he had already held his first consulship before being adopted by Nerva (BMCRE p. lv).…

Trajan, 98-117 AD, AR Denarius, Virtus, struck c. 116 AD

Trajan was one of the greatest Roman Emperors. A former soldier, he expanded the Roman Empire to its largest size in history. A philanthropist who invested in social welfare and public building programs, he is known as the second of the Five Good Emperors. Minted toward the end of Trajan's reign, the obverse legend is nearly at its fullest, and includes the recently added PARTHICO, ('Parthicus'), a military honour, which 'commemorates the height of Trajan's success, the capture of Ctesiphon and the collapse of the Parthian resistance (BMCRE p. lxxxv).…

Trajan, 98-117 AD, Syria, Seleucis and Pieria, Antioch, AE28, SC, struck 114-117 AD

Trajan was one of the greatest Roman Emperors. A former soldier and adopted heir to Nerva, he expanded the Roman Empire to its largest size in history. A philanthropist who invested in social welfare and public building programs, he is known as the second of the Five Good Emperors. This coin was struck at the Antioch mint in Syria, most likely after Trajan's acquisition of the title Optimus in circa 114 AD. The purpose of the pellets and numeral letters on the coins from Antioch must have served some purpose but what that purpose was exactly has been lost in time and remains today the subject of some speculation.…

Trajan, 98-117 AD, Syria, Seleucis and Pieria, Antioch, AR Tetradrachm, Melqart-Herakles, struck 112 AD, McAlee Plate Coin

Trajan was one of the greatest Roman Emperors. A former soldier, he expanded the Roman Empire to its largest size in history. A philanthropist who invested in social welfare and public building programs, he is known as the second of the Five Good Emperors.…

Trajan, 98-117 AD, Syria, Seleucis and Pieria, Antioch, AR Tetradrachm, struck 98-99 AD, RPC Plate Coin, Prieur Plate Coin

Trajan was one of the greatest Roman Emperors. A former soldier, he expanded the Roman Empire to its largest size in history. A philanthropist who invested in social welfare and public building programs, he is known as the second of the Five Good Emperors.…

Trajan, AR Denarius, Aeternitas, 98-117 AD

Aeternitas was the divine personification of eternity. She features on the coins of Vespasian, Titus, Trajan, Hadrian, Antoninus Pius, and Septimius Severus. This is a nice example of a ancient roman coin (denarius) issued under Trajan. Slight overall wear, however with details clearly visible and the inscriptions legible.…

Trajan, AR Drachm of Lycia, 98-99 AD

Originally independent, Lycia became a province of Rome in 43 AD under the Roman Emperor Claudius. Trajan was one of the greatest Roman Emperors. A former soldier, he expanded the Roman Empire to its largest size in history. A philanthropist who invested in social welfare and public building programs, he is known as the second of the Five Good Emperors.…

Trajan, AR Tetradrachm of Phoenicia, Tyre, 	111-112 AD

Nice portrait of an older looking Trajan and a striking portrayal of the city goddess Tyche. gVF.…

Trajan, Denarius, Felicitas, 103-111 AD

Wide flan. Nice toning. Trajan was one of the greatest Roman Emperors. A former soldier, he expanded the Roman Empire to its largest size in history. A philanthropist who invested in social welfare and public building programs, he is known as the second of the Five Good Emperors.…

Trajan, Sestertius, Via Traiana, 112-114 AD

The Via Traiana symbolised on the reverse of this coin was a major Roman road linking Rome to the East. It was completed in 113 AD under Trajan. Trajan was one of the greatest Roman Emperors. A former soldier, he expanded the Roman Empire to its largest size in history. A philanthropist who invested in social welfare and public building programs, he is known as the second of the Five Good Emperors.…

Trajan, Sestertius, Victory Reverse, 98-117 AD

This large sestertius of Trajan features an interesting reverse as well as a nice green?patina.…

Trebonianus Gallus, 251-253 AD, Syria, Seleucis and Pieria, Antioch, BI Tetradrachm, Eagle, struck 251 AD

Trebonianus Gallus (Gaius Vibius Afinius Trebonianus Gallus Augustus), also known as "Gallus" was Roman Emperor from 251 to 253 AD, jointly ruling with his son Volusianus. Gallus was made emperor following the deaths of Trajan Decius and Herennius Etrsucs at the Battle of Abrittus, largely due to Gallus conspiring with the enemy. Initially co-ruling with Hostilian, the surviving son of Decius, Gallus soon appointed his own son, Volusianus as Caesar. Both Gallus and Volusianus were killed in August 253 after his army proclaimed Aemilianus as emperor, having lost faith in Gallus.…

Trebonianus Gallus, 251-253 AD, Syria, Seleucis and Pieria, Antioch, BI Tetradrachm, Eagle, struck 251 AD

Trebonianus Gallus (Gaius Vibius Afinius Trebonianus Gallus Augustus), also known as "Gallus" was Roman Emperor from 251 to 253 AD, jointly ruling with his son Volusianus. Gallus was made emperor following the deaths of Trajan Decius and Herennius Etrsucs at the Battle of Abrittus, largely due to Gallus conspiring with the enemy. Initially co-ruling with Hostilian, the surviving son of Decius, Gallus soon appointed his own son, Volusianus as Caesar. Both Gallus and Volusianus were killed in August 253 after his army proclaimed Aemilianus as emperor, having lost faith in Gallus.…

Trebonianus Gallus, 251-253 AD, Syria, Seleucis and Pieria, Antioch, BI Tetradrachm, Eagle, struck 252-253 AD

Trebonianus Gallus (Gaius Vibius Afinius Trebonianus Gallus Augustus), also known as "Gallus" was Roman Emperor from 251 to 253 AD, jointly ruling with his son Volusianus. Gallus was made emperor following the deaths of Trajan Decius and Herennius Etrsucs at the Battle of Abrittus, largely due to Gallus conspiring with the enemy. Initially co-ruling with Hostilian, the surviving son of Decius, Gallus soon appointed his own son, Volusianus as Caesar. Both Gallus and Volusianus were killed in August 253 after his army proclaimed Aemilianus as emperor, having lost faith in Gallus.…

Urbs Roma - Commemorative Issue, Celebrating Rome / Constantinople, 330-333 AD

A special coin indeed! Issued under Constantine I the Great to celebrate the foundation of Constantinople and to also reaffirm Rome as the traditional centre of the Roman Empire. A beautiful example of an ancient commemorative coin.…

Vespasian Ae AS EF portrait

Vespasian is considered one of the best emperors that has reigned in Rome. This is a high quality As of the emperor in about EF condition.…

Vespasian, 69-79 AD, AR Denarius, Pax, struck 75 AD

Vespasian was Roman emperor from 69 to 79 AD. The beginning of his reign marked the end of the tumultuous period of leadership, which included the Year of Four Emperors, returning stability to the Roman Empire. Vespasian reformed the financial system and started large construction activities, most notably the Roman Colosseum, which was completed during the reign of his son Titus. This coin was minted during Vespasian's sixth consulship.…

Vespasian, 69-79 AD, Syria, Seleucis and Pieria, Antioch, AR Tetradrachm, struck 69/70 AD

Vespasian was Roman emperor from AD 69 to AD 79. The beginning of his reign marked the end of the tumultuous period of leadership, which included the Year of Four Emperors, returning stability to the Roman Empire. Vespasian reformed the financial system and started large construction activities, most notably the Roman Colosseum, which was completed during the reign of his son Titus.…

Vespasian, 69-79 AD, Syria, Seleucis and Pieria, Antioch, AR Tetradrachm, struck 69/70 AD

Vespasian was Roman emperor from AD 69 to AD 79. The beginning of his reign marked the end of the tumultuous period of leadership, which included the Year of Four Emperors, returning stability to the Roman Empire. Vespasian reformed the financial system and started large construction activities, most notably the Roman Colosseum, which was completed during the reign of his son Titus.…

Vespasian, AR Denarius, Clasped Hands Reverse, 72-79 AD

The reverse of this coin is one of the best of its kind. It superior to the plate "clasped hands' or "FIDES PVBL" coin held by the British Museum. According to the reference Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, "FIDESL PVBL" first appeared on coinage of Vespasian in 72 AD. Vespasian was Roman emperor from 69 to 79 AD. The beginning of his reign marked the end of the tumultuous period of leadership, which included the Year of Four Emperors, returning stability to the Roman Empire. Vespasian reformed the financial system and started large construction activities, most notably the Roman Colosseum, which was completed during the reign of his son Titus.…

Vespasian, AR Denarius, Implements, 72-73 AD

Vespasian was Roman emperor from 69 to 79 AD. The beginning of his reign marked the end of the tumultuous period of leadership, which included the Year of Four Emperors, returning stability to the Roman Empire. Vespasian reformed the financial system and started large construction activities, most notably the Roman Colosseum, which was completed during the reign of his son Titus.…

Vespasian, AR Denarius, Implements, 72-73 AD

Bold portrait. good Very Fine. Nice toning and colour. Vespasian was Roman emperor from AD 69 to AD 79. The beginning of his reign marked the end of the tumultuous period of leadership, which included the Year of Four Emperors, returning stability to the Roman Empire. Vespasian reformed the financial system and started large construction activities, most notably the Roman Colosseum, which was completed during the reign of his son Titus.…

Vespasian, AR Denarius, Salus, 73 AD

Vespasian was Roman emperor from AD 69 to AD 79. The beginning of his reign marked the end of the tumultuous period of leadership, which included the Year of Four Emperors, returning stability to the Roman Empire. Vespasian reformed the financial system and started large construction activities, most notably the Roman Colosseum, which was completed during the reign of his son Titus.…

Vespasian, Sestertius, Salus, 71AD

Vespasian was Roman emperor from AD 69 to AD 79. The beginning of his reign marked the end of the tumultuous period of leadership, which included the Year of Four Emperors, returning stability to the Roman Empire. Vespasian reformed the financial system and started large construction activities, most notably the Roman Colosseum, which was completed during the reign of his son Titus. Volume II of Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum attributes this Sestertius as being minted during Vespasian's third consulship ("COS III"), during which the following events occurred: his son Titus returned to Rome; Triumph of Vespasian and Titus; Lucilius Bassus takes Herodium and Machaerus; Temple of Janus closed; Temple of Peace begun.…

Vitellius, AR Denarius, Vesta, 69 AD

Vitellius was emperor for just 8 months. One of four emperors in the Year of the Four Emperors in 69 AD, he was executed by Vespasian's soldiers. The end of his reign marked the the civil war and a new era of peace and prosperity for Rome under Vespasian. The reverse legend "PONT MAXIM"refers to Vitellius being elected Pontifex Maximus on July 18. Vesta is pictured on the verse, reflecting the close connection which existed between the Pontifex Maximus and the worship of Vesta.…

Vitellius, AR Denarius, Victory, 69 AD

Extremely rare coin. Beautiful toning. Vitellius was emperor for just 8 months. One of four emperors in the Year of the Four Emperors in 69 AD, he was executed by Vespasian's soldiers. The end of his reign marked the the civil war and a new era of peace and prosperity for Rome under Vespasian.…

᷅  <font color="#FF0000"><b>SOLD</b></font color>:  Caligula Ae As: EF

This is one of the most brilliant portraits of Caligula on an Ae As that I have ever seen. The portrait itself is EF bordering on UNC! The reverse is also sharp featuring detail on the high points, spoiled only by its limited patina covering. If you have or know of an AS of Caligula for sale that is better, please let me know, I'll like to add it to my collection!…

᷅  <font color="#FF0000"><b>SOLD</b></font color>:  Claudius Ae As

An absolutely stunning coin of emperor claudius. Portraits like these are rarely seen on an As. This is the best Claudius As that we have come across.…

᷅  <font color="#FF0000"><b>SOLD</b></font color>:  Silver Republican Denarius of L.Memmius.

This is a superb specimen from Rome's Republican era with a detailed portrait on the obverse and a fascinating scene on the reverse.

Sorry, but this coin has been sold!…

᷅  <font color="#FF0000"><b>SOLD</b></font color>: Agrippa Ae As

Amazing portrait of Agrippa. Coin is EF condition. Beautiful apple-green patina.

Agrippa was a very close friend of the emperor Augustus. He was a brilliant general, winning the battle of Actium against Cleopatra and Marc Antony. He was to be the next emperor of Rome after Augustus, but alas predeceased emperor Augustus.…

᷅  <font color="#FF0000"><b>SOLD</b></font color>: Agrippa, Ae As, 37-41 AD

Agrippa was a very close friend of the emperor Augustus. A brilliant general, he defeated Cleopatra and Mark Antony in the battle of Actium. In the coins of this type he is seen with his chief title of honour (COS. III) as well as the rostra crown (corona navalis) in honour of his victories at Naulochus and Actium.…

᷅  <font color="#FF0000"><b>SOLD</b></font color>: Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD, AR Denarius, Pax, 155-156 AD

Antoninus Pius was one of the Five Good Emperors. Under his 23 year long reign, Rome saw peace that it had not seen for some time.…

᷅  <font color="#FF0000"><b>SOLD</b></font color>: Augustus, 31 BC - 14 AD, Macedon, Thessalonica, AE20

The first Roman Emperor and material great-nephew of Julius Caesar, Augustus ruled Rome from 27 C to 14 AD. The adopted son of and heir apparent of Julius Caesar, Augustus, then Octavian, together with Mark Antony and Marucs Lepidus formed the Second Triumrivate, each controlling a portion of the Roman Republic as military dictators. E ventually, turning against one another, Augustus prevailed, with Lepidus driven to exile, and Mark Antony, to suicide with Cleopatra, following their defeat at Alexandria.…

᷅  <font color="#FF0000"><b>SOLD</b></font color>: Aurelian Silvered Antoninianus, 270-275 AD

Beautifully struck coin from later Roman Empire with all details and inscriptions intact.…

᷅  <font color="#FF0000"><b>SOLD</b></font color>: Caligula Ae As: F

A good example of the highly desirable Caligula As. Remnants of patina visible.

Sorry, this coin has been sold!…

᷅  <font color="#FF0000"><b>SOLD</b></font color>: Caligula Sestertius

An affordable example of what usually is an extremely expensive coin, out of the reach of many collectors.For a biography about the intriguing emperor Caligula: click here.…

᷅  <font color="#FF0000"><b>SOLD</b></font color>: Claudius Ae As

Claudius replaced Caligula after the former emperor was murdered. He was a reclusive and suffered physical deformities. He was unveiled to the public at the age of 46 by his nephew, only in order for his nephew to spite the Senate. He turned out not to be an incompetent ruler. In fact the only poor decision he made was to marry his niece (the future mother of Nero).…

᷅  <font color="#FF0000"><b>SOLD</b></font color>: Constantine I, 306-337 AD, AE17, Urbs Roma, Commemorative Issue, struck 330-335 AD

Constantine I "the Great" was Roman Emperor from 306 to 337 AD. He became sole Emperor of the Western and Eastern Roman Empires following the defeat of emperors Maxentius and Licinius. He renamed the city of Byzantium as Constantinople which become the capital of the Roman Empire, and later the Byzantine Empire, for the next thousand years. The first Roman Emperor to convert to Christianity he had a great influence on the transition to Christianity as the dominant religion in the Roman Empire…

᷅  <font color="#FF0000"><b>SOLD</b></font color>: Constantine I, As Caesar, 306-312 AD, AE Follis, Genius, struck 305-307 AD

Constantine I "the Great" was Roman Emperor from 306 to 337 AD. He became sole Emperor of the Western and Eastern Roman Empires following the defeat of emperors Maxentius and Licinius. He renamed the city of Byzantium as Constantinople which become the capital of the Roman Empire, and later the Byzantine Empire, for the next thousand years. The first Roman Emperor to convert to Christianity he had a great influence on the transition to Christianity as the dominant religion in the Roman Empire…

᷅  <font color="#FF0000"><b>SOLD</b></font color>: Constantine II, AE Follis, Campgate, 317 AD

An attractive example of the well known campgate reverse type paired with a "small bust" obverse.

Flavius Claudius Constantinus Augustus (Constantine II), was the son of Constantine the Great. Roman emperor from 337 to 340AD. Initially co-ruling with his brothers, Constantius II and Constans, the three agreed to split the Roman Empire into territories with Constantine II taking Gaul, Britannia and Hispania. He died during failed invasion of Italy and was succeeded by his brother Constans as Roman Emperor.…

᷅  <font color="#FF0000"><b>SOLD</b></font color>: Crispus, Ae Follis, Antioch Mint, 317-326 AD

Rare coin from the Antioch mint. Flavius Julius Crispus was a Caesar of the Roman Empire. The co-reigning Roman Emperors Constantine and Licinius appointed three Caesars in 217 AD, Crispus being one of them. Respected by his soldiers for his proven strategic abilities, Crispus assisted Constantine in a war against Licinius. Crispus's promising life came to an end when at his father's orders he was tried, condemned to death, then executed.…

᷅  <font color="#FF0000"><b>SOLD</b></font color>: Divus Constantine I the Great, AE Silvered Follis, Posthumous Issue, 347-348 AD

Constantine I "the Great" was Roman Emperor from 306 to 337 AD. He became sole Emperor of the Western and Eastern Roman Empires following the defeat of emperors Maxentius and Licinius. He renamed the city of Byzantium as Constantinople which become the capital of the Roman Empire, and later the Byzantine Empire, for the next thousand years. The first Roman Emperor to convert to Christianity he had a great influence on the transition to Christianity as the dominant religion in the Roman Empire. This coin was issued posthumously under the rule of Constantius II and Constans in honour of Constantine I.…

᷅  <font color="#FF0000"><b>SOLD</b></font color>: Domitian Sestertius

From the John F. Sullivan Collection. Ex Knobloch Collection (Stack's, 1-3 May 1980), lot 412.…

᷅  <font color="#FF0000"><b>SOLD</b></font color>: Domitian, Caesar, 69-81 AD, Syria, Seleucis and Pieria, Antioch, AE21, SC, struck 69-79 AD

Domitianus (Domitian) was the son and heir of the Roman Emperor Vespasian. His 15 year reign (the longest since Tiberius) came to an abrupt end when he was assassinated by court officials. The Antioch coinage of Domitian was struck both during Vespasian's reign and during Domitian's own reign as Roman Emperor. This coin was struck under Vespasian's reign, evident by the long thin leaves and looped ties at the bottom of the wreath. Under Domitian's reign, the pellets would later be replaced with a numerical system. The purpose of the pellets and numeral letters on the coins from Antioch must have served some purpose but what that purpose was exactly has been lost in time and remains today the subject of some speculation.…

᷅  <font color="#FF0000"><b>SOLD</b></font color>: Faustina I the Elder, 138-141 AD, AR Denarius, Ceres, Posthumous Issue, struck 141-161 AD

Faustina I the elder was born circa 100 AD and died in 140 AD. She was the wife of the Roman emperor Antoninus Pius, one of the Five Good Emperors. This sestertius was part of a third issue of coinage in her honour after her death and is likely to have been minted some time between the end of the second issue (141 AD) and the end of Antonius Pius's reign as Roman Emperor, most likely toward the end of that reign. A more precise dating is not currently known. The coinage bears the legend DIVA FAVSTINA, not DIVA AVGVSTA, as the title of Augusta had passed onto her daughter, Faustina II the Younger. Ceres was the Roman goddess of agriculture. She features prominently on coins of Faustina.…

᷅  <font color="#FF0000"><b>SOLD</b></font color>: Gallienus

A quite beautiful coin, this gallienus retains most of its silvering giving it a reflective, proof-like appearance.

Sorry, this coin has been sold!…

᷅  <font color="#FF0000"><b>SOLD</b></font color>: Hadrian Platform Sestertius

This is an amazing sestertius of Hadrian. Not only does it feature a brilliant portrait of the emperor, but also the rare platform reverse, quite a change from the plainer reverses.…

᷅  <font color="#FF0000"><b>SOLD</b></font color>: Hadrian Sestertius

Sorry, this coin has been sold!…

᷅  <font color="#FF0000"><b>SOLD</b></font color>: Hadrian, 117-138 AD, AR Denarius, Roma or Virtus, struck 125-128 AD

Hadrian was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138 AD. One of the "Five Good Emperors", Hadrian continued to lead the Roman Empire into an era of prosperity.…

᷅  <font color="#FF0000"><b>SOLD</b></font color>: Hadrian, 117-138 AD, Syria, Seleucis and Pieria, Antioch, AR Tetradrachm, Eagle, struck 118 AD

Hadrian was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138 AD. One of the "Five Good Emperors", Hadrian continued to lead the Roman Empire into an era of prosperity, such that he was declared Optimus Princeps ('the best ruler') by the Senate. This tetradrachm was struck early during Hadrian's reign. It s closely resembles the portrait of the preceding Roman Emperor, Hadrian's adoptive father Trajan.…

᷅  <font color="#FF0000"><b>SOLD</b></font color>: Julius Caesar  Bronze Coin

Very Rare coin of Augustus featuring a portrait of Julius Caesar himself. Wonderful coin with portraits of Romes 1st emperor on one side and Julius Caesar on the other.…

᷅  <font color="#FF0000"><b>SOLD</b></font color>: Lydia, Nacrassa, AE17, Pseudo-autonomous Issue, Time of Trajan to the Antonines,  98-161 AD

The beginning of the legend is mostly obscured. From what we could make of it, it appears more likely to be IEPA than ΘΕΩΝ. Nacrasa was located around modern Bakir in North Lydia. It was originally a Seleucid stronghold. However no coinage has been identified from a times prior to it falling under Roman rule. Its coinage includes pseudo-autonomous issues (no emperor portrait) as well as Roman provincial / Greek Imperial issues.…

᷅  <font color="#FF0000"><b>SOLD</b></font color>: Marcus Aurelius, As Caesar, 139-161 AD, AE Sestertius, Genius Exercitus, struck 151-152 AD

Marcus Aurelius was Roman Emperor from 161 to 180 AD. Known to many as the old Emperor at the beginning of the movie Gladiator, Marcus Aurelius was the last of the Five Good Emperors. Following his death he was succeeded by his son Commodus who is remembered in history for a legacy of eccentricity, cruelty and poor management of the Roman Empire.…

᷅  <font color="#FF0000"><b>SOLD</b></font color>: Nero Sestertius: Triumphal Arch

This is a beautiful authentic sestertius minted under the reign of the infamous Emperor Nero. He is one of the few emperors that most people are familiar with probably due to the belief that he started the great fires of Rome. He lived from 54-68 until, he committed suicide. His last words are document to be: "Qualis artifex pereo." ("What an artist the world loses in me."). This coin is in great condition for a coin of this size with a great portait of the popular emperor. It still retains most of its attractive olive green patina.…

᷅  <font color="#FF0000"><b>SOLD</b></font color>: Nero, AR Hemidrachm of Caesarea, Cappadocia, Victory Standing, 54-68 AD

Possibly the most infamous of the Roman Emperors, Nero ruled Rome from 54 AD until his death by his own hand in 68 AD. From murdering his mother and other political opponents to (according to rumour) starting the great fires of Rome, the stories about his reign paint a picture of a tyrannical and impulsive Emperor that the people of Rome were glad to see gone. Victory on the reverse of this coin is the personification of the goddess of victory. She is the equivalent of Nike, the Greek goddess who is often seen in the hand of Athena on ancient Greek coins.…

᷅  <font color="#FF0000"><b>SOLD</b></font color>: Nero, with Agrippina Junior, 54-68 AD, Syria, Seleucis and Pieria, Antioch, AR Tetradrachm, struck c. 56-57 AD

Possibly the most infamous of the Roman Emperors, Nero ruled Rome from 54 AD until his death by his own hand in 68 AD. From murdering his mother, Agrippina Junior, and other political opponents to (according to rumour) starting the great fires of Rome, the stories about his reign paint a picture of a tyrannical and impulsive Emperor that the people of Rome were glad to see gone.…

᷅  <font color="#FF0000"><b>SOLD</b></font color>: Nerva, 96-98 AD, Syria, Seleucis and Pieria, Antioch, AR Tetradrachm, Eagle

A rare silver tetradrachm of Nerva from the Antioch mint in Syria. Only 8 specimens recorded in Prieur. At the elderly age of 65, Nerva became Roman emperor. His reign lasted only 2 years. He adopted Trajan, then a general, as a heir and his successor. One of the Roman Emperors fortunate enough to die of natural causes, he was succeeded by Trajan, who went on to have a long and prosperous reign.…

᷅  <font color="#FF0000"><b>SOLD</b></font color>: Otho, 69 AD, Syria, Seleucis and Pieria, Antioch, AR Tetradrachm, Eagle

A rare silver tetradrachm of Otho from the Antioch mint in Syria. Otho was Roman Emperor for only 3 months! A friend to the infamous Emperor Nero, he found fame as Roman Emperor after overthrowing the Roman Emperor Galba. Like Nero, his life ended in his own hands during the Battle of Bedriacum. Reportedly the reason for his suicide was to spare his country from a civil war. This final act earned him the respect of all Romans.…

᷅  <font color="#FF0000"><b>SOLD</b></font color>: Probus Antoninianus

Sorry, this coin has been sold!…

᷅  <font color="#FF0000"><b>SOLD</b></font color>: Probus, 276-282 AD, Silvered Antoninianus, Adventus, struck 279 AD

Probus was a military Emperor. On reaching adulthood he joined the military where he proved himself capable, enough so that he was later appointed governor of the East by the emperor Tacitus. When Tacitus died, Probus was proclaimed emperor by his soldiers. During his reign, he was successful in his campaigns in Gaul and in strengthening the Rhine and Danube frontier against the Germanic tribes.…

᷅  <font color="#FF0000"><b>SOLD</b></font color>: Pupienus, 238 AD, AR Antoninianus, Clasped Hands, struck April-July 238 AD

Pupienus (Marcus Clodius Pupienus Maximus Augustus) jointly ruled with Balbinus as Roman Emperor for just three months in 238 AD, during the tumultuous 'Year of the Six Emperors'. According to the 'Dictionary of Roman Coins', the reverse legend, AMOR MVTVVS AVGG, featuring on coinage of both Balbinus and Pupienus, translates as 'Mutual affection of the Emperors' and symbolises the equal and joint rule of the co-emperors.…

᷅  <font color="#FF0000"><b>SOLD</b></font color>: Roman Republic Denarius "TRIGA 79 BC"

79 BC Silver Denarius Serratus: "Rome is state on the move, and growing stronger every day."

Sorry, this item has been sold! …

᷅  <font color="#FF0000"><b>SOLD</b></font color>: Roman Republic, C. Valerius C.f. Flaccus, Moneyer, AR Denarius, 140 BC

Not much is known about the moneyer C.Valerius. The reverse of Victory driving a biga was thought to have been introduced as tribute to the defeat of Perseus of Macedon at the battle of Pydna by Lucius Aemilius Paulus in 168 BC.…

᷅  <font color="#FF0000"><b>SOLD</b></font color>: Severus Alexander, 222-235 AD, AE Sestertius, Mars, struck 232 AD

Severus Alexander was Roman Emperor from 222 to 235 AD. He was the last emperor of the Severan dynasty. His death marked the beginning of the Crisis of the Third Century, during which the Roman Empire would almost crumble. He was assassinated in 235 AD by mutinous soldiers paving the way for Maximus to become Roman Emperor. This coin was issued late into his reign by which stage he had developed a fully grown beard. The reverse legend, MARS VLTOR, translates to 'Mars the Avenger' the cult of which was earlier established by the Roman Emperor Augustus.…

᷅  <font color="#FF0000"><b>SOLD</b></font color>: Silver Denarius of Domitian

Coin expected within 2 weeks…

᷅  <font color="#FF0000"><b>SOLD</b></font color>: Trajan As

Nice As of Trajan. Evidence of repatination and slight restoration by previous owner, otherwise a decent coin.…

᷅  <font color="#FF0000"><b>SOLD</b></font color>: Trajan Denarius: Equity

Coin is expected within next couple of weeks…

᷅  <font color="#FF0000"><b>SOLD</b></font color>: Trajan Dupondius: Trajans Column

A beautiful coin featuring Trajan's column. Trajan's column is a piece of ancient architecture which still exists today in Rome overlooking the Trajan Markets.?For an article (including pictures) on Trajan's column, click here.…

᷅  <font color="#FF0000"><b>SOLD</b></font color>: Trajan, 98-117 AD, AR Denarius, Column of Trajan, struck 112-117 AD

Wide flan. Nice toning. Trajan was one of the greatest Roman Emperors. A former soldier, he expanded the Roman Empire to its largest size in history. A philanthropist who invested in social welfare and public building programs, he is known as the second of the Five Good Emperors. Trajan's column is a Roman triumphal column. Still standing today in the Roman Forum, it was originally built to commemorate Trajan's victory in the Dacian wars. One of the few structures depicted on an ancient Roman coin to still exist today.…

᷅  <font color="#FF0000"><b>SOLD</b></font color>: Trajan, 98-117 AD, AR Denarius, Felicitas, struck 112-117 AD

Trajan was one of the greatest Roman Emperors. A former soldier, he expanded the Roman Empire to its largest size in history. A philanthropist who invested in social welfare and public building programs, he is known as the second of the Five Good Emperors.…

᷅  <font color="#FF0000"><b>SOLD</b></font color>: Trajan, 98-117 AD, AR Denarius, Mars, struck c. 106-107 AD

Trajan was one of the greatest Roman Emperors. A former soldier, he expanded the Roman Empire to its largest size in history. A philanthropist who invested in social welfare and public building programs, he is known as the second of the Five Good Emperors.…

᷅  <font color="#FF0000"><b>SOLD</b></font color>: Trajan, AE30, 98-117 AD, Cyrenaica and Crete, Cyrene, Zeus-Ammon, struck 103-111 AD

Trajan was one of the greatest Roman Emperors. A former soldier, he expanded the Roman Empire to its largest size in history. A philanthropist who invested in social welfare and public building programs, he is known as the second of the Five Good Emperors. Cyrene was an ancient Greek and later, Roman city, located in what is today Shahhat, Libya. The city became a Roman province in 74 BC.…

᷅  <font color="#FF0000"><b>SOLD</b></font color>: Valens: Ae3 Roman Coin.

A very nice coin of Emperor Valens.
Sorry, this coin has been sold!…

᷅  <font color="#FF0000"><b>SOLD</b></font color>: Vespasian, with Titus as Caesar, 69-79 AD, Syria, Seleucis and Pieria, Antioch, AR Tetradrachm, New Holy Year 2, struck 69/70 AD

Vespasian was Roman emperor from AD 69 to AD 79. The beginning of his reign marked the end of the tumultuous period of leadership, which included the Year of Four Emperors, returning stability to the Roman Empire. Vespasian reformed the financial system and started large construction activities, most notably the Roman Colosseum, which was completed during the reign of his son Titus.…

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