Maxentius, 306-312 AD, AE Follis, Roma in Temple, struck 307 AD
Ruler/Emperor:
Maxentius
City/Region:
Rome mint, 1st officina
Denomination:
AE Follis
Composition:
Silvered copper
Date:
Struck early Autumn of 307 AD
Obverse:
IMP C MAXENTIVS P F AVG, Head of Maxentius, laureate, right
Reverse:
CONSERVATO-RES VRB SVAE, Roma seated facing, head left, in hexastyle temple, holding glove in right hand, sceptre in left, shield at side; knobs as acroteria; plain pediment; in exergue, R*P mintmark
Size:
26.20mm, 6.10 g, 11h
Grade:
Good VF, well centred on tight flan, well defined portrait, cabinet toning
Rarity:
scarce, Ric rarity S
Provenance:
From the Matthew Rich Collection, ex Classical Numismatic Group eAuction 412 (17 January 2018), Lot 673); ex Fairfield Collection, Classical Numismatic Group eAuction 329 (25 June 2014), Lot 547; ex Elliott-Kent Collection, Classical Numismatic Group eAuction 232 (28 April 2010), Lot 349
References:

Maxentius (Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maxentius Augustus) was Roman Emperor from 306 to 312. His father was the Roman Emperor Maximian. He was a prolific builder: the great basilica in the forum Romanum and the Circus Maxentius (second in size only to the Circus Maximus) were both built during his reign. He lost the civil war against Licinius and Constantine at the Battle of the Milvian Bridge and is thought to have died by drowning in the Tiber River. After his death, Constantine issued a damnatio memoriae against him. Buildings were renamed after Constantine. Additionally Constantine's propaganda ensured that history represented Maxentius as a cruel and incompetent ruler.