Roman

Ancient roman coins were minted from the 3rd century BC until the 5th century AD. Ancient roman coins commonly feature a portrait of an individual (e.g. the emperor) on the obverse and a deity on the reverse. Some of the most detailed portraits of an emperor can be found on an ancient roman coin. In many of these ancient roman coins we see what the roman emperors must have looked like in life. In this section you will also discover Roman Provincial (or Greek Imperial) coins.
Domitian, Augustus, 81-96 AD, Syria, Seleucis and Pieria, Antioch, AE30, SC, struck 81-83 AD

Domitianus (Domitian) was the son and heir of the Roman Emperor Vespasian. His 15 year reign (the longest since Tiberius) came to an abrupt end when he was assassinated by court officials. The Antioch coinage of Domitian was struck both during Vespasian's reign and during Domitian's own reign as Roman Emperor. This coin was struck under Domitian's reign, evident by the broader leaves, simplified ties at the bottom of the wreath; the simplified wreath tie on the obverse' and the theta under the SC. Under Domitian's reign, the pellets would later be replaced with a numerical system. The purpose of the pellets and numeral letters on the coins from Antioch must have served some purpose but what that purpose was exactly has been lost in time and remains today the subject of some speculation.…

Domitian, Caesar, 69-81 AD, Syria, Seleucis and Pieria, Antioch, AE21, SC, struck 69-79 AD

Domitianus (Domitian) was the son and heir of the Roman Emperor Vespasian. His 15 year reign (the longest since Tiberius) came to an abrupt end when he was assassinated by court officials. The Antioch coinage of Domitian was struck both during Vespasian's reign and during Domitian's own reign as Roman Emperor. This coin was struck under Vespasian's reign, evident by the long thin leaves and looped ties at the bottom of the wreath. Under Domitian's reign, the pellets would later be replaced with a numerical system. The purpose of the pellets and numeral letters on the coins from Antioch must have served some purpose but what that purpose was exactly has been lost in time and remains today the subject of some speculation.…

Elagabalus, 218-222 AD, AE21, Syria, Seleucis and Pieria, Antioch, SC

Elagabalus was Roman Emperor from 218 to 222 AD. Born in Syria, he was later named after the god Elagabal whom he served as a priest in his youth. He lived an extremely eccentric and decadent life showing total disregard for Roman traditions. This most likely led to his assassination at the young age of 18 in a plot organised by his aunt, Julia Maesa.…

Elagabalus, 218-222 AD, AE26, Moesia Inferior, Marcianopolis, Demeter

Elagabalus was Roman Emperor from 218 to 222 AD. Born in Syria, he was later named after the god Elagabal whom he served as a priest in his youth. He lived an extremely eccentric and decadent life showing total disregard for Roman traditions. This most likely led to his assassination at the young age of 18 in a plot organised by his aunt, Julia Maesa. This coin was struck under the consular legate Sergius Titianus in Marcianopolis, a city founded by Trajan and named after his sister, Marciana.…

Elagabalus, 218-222 AD, AE26, Moesia Inferior, Marcianopolis, Nemesis

Elagabalus was Roman Emperor from 218 to 222 AD. Born in Syria, he was later named after the god Elagabal whom he served as a priest in his youth. He lived an extremely eccentric and decadent life showing total disregard for Roman traditions. This most likely led to his assassination at the young age of 18 in a plot organised by his aunt, Julia Maesa. The city of Marcianopolis was founded by Trajan and named after his sister Marciana.…

Elagabalus, 218-222 AD, AR Denarius, Emperor at Altar, struck 221 AD

Elagabalus was Roman Emperor from 218 to 222 AD. Born in Syria, he was later named after the god Elagabal whom he served as a priest in his youth. He lived an extremely eccentric and decadent life showing total disregard for Roman traditions. This most likely led to his assassination at the young age of 18 in a plot organised by his aunt, Julia Maesa.…

Elagabalus, AE30, Provincial, Samosata, Tyche, 218 to 222 AD

Elagabalus was Roman Emperor from 218 to 222 AD. Born in Syria, he was later named after the god Elagabal whom he served as a priest in his youth. He lived an extremely eccentric and decadent life showing total disregard for Roman traditions. This most likely led to his assassination at the young age of 18 in a plot organised by his aunt, Julia Maesa.…

Elagabalus, with Julia Maesa, 218-222 AD, Moesia Inferior, Marcianopolis, AE Pentassarion, Tyche, struck 220-221 AD

Elagabalus was Roman Emperor from 218 to 222 AD. Born in Syria, he was later named after the god Elagabal whom he served as a priest in his youth. He lived an extremely eccentric and decadent life showing total disregard for Roman traditions. This most likely led to his assassination at the young age of 18 in a plot organised by his aunt, Julia Maesa. This coin was struck under the consular legate Julius Antonius Seleucus in Marcianopolis, a city founded by Trajan and named after his sister, Marciana.…

Faustina I the Elder, 138-141 AD, AE As, Altar, Posthumous Issue, struck c. 141-146 AD

Faustina I the elder was born circa 100 AD and died in 140 AD. She was the wife of the Roman emperor Antoninus Pius, one of the Five Good Emperors. For many years after her passing, Antoninus Pius continued to honour her memory through the issuing of coinage in her image. This Ae As was part of a second such issue of coinage and dates to a period beginning in 141 AD and immediately afterwards. A more precise dating is unknown. As the obverse legend still contains AVGVSTA it is likely that this coin was struck prior to the title of Augusta being passed onto her daughter, Faustina II, the Younger in 147 AD. The reverse type for this coin depicts an altar, from the Temple of Faustina. On some coins, the altar is lighted.…

Faustina I the Elder, 138-141 AD, AE As, Vesta, Posthumous issue, struck 146-161 AD

Faustina I the elder was born circa 100 AD and died in 140 AD. She was the wife of the Roman emperor Antoninus Pius, one of the Five Good Emperors. This As was part of a third issue of coinage in her honour after her death and is likely to have been minted some time between the end of the second issue (141 AD) and the end of Antonius Pius's reign as Roman Emperor, most likely toward the end of that reign. A more precise dating is not currently known. The coinage bears the legend DIVA FAVSTINA, not DIVA AVGVSTA, as the title of Augusta had passed onto her daughter, Faustina II the Younger.…

Faustina I the Elder, 138-141 AD, AE Sestertius, Aeternitas, Posthumous Issue, struck 141-161 AD

Faustina I the elder was born circa 100 AD and died in 140 AD. She was the wife of the Roman emperor Antoninus Pius, one of the Five Good Emperors. This sestertius was part of a third issue of coinage in her honour after her death and is likely to have been minted some time between the end of the second issue (141 AD) and the end of Antonius Pius's reign as Roman Emperor, most likely toward the end of that reign. A more precise dating is not currently known. The coinage bears the legend DIVA FAVSTINA, not DIVA AVGVSTA, as the title of Augusta had passed onto her daughter, Faustina II the Younger.…

Faustina I the Elder, 138-141 AD, AE Sestertius, Aeternitas, Posthumous Issue, struck 141-161 AD

Faustina I the elder was born circa 100 AD and died in 140 AD. She was the wife of the Roman emperor Antoninus Pius, one of the Five Good Emperors. This sestertius was part of a third issue of coinage in her honour after her death and is likely to have been minted some time between the end of the second issue (141 AD) and the end of Antonius Pius's reign as Roman Emperor, most likely toward the end of that reign. A more precise dating is not currently known. The coinage bears the legend DIVA FAVSTINA, not DIVA AVGVSTA, as the title of Augusta had passed onto her daughter, Faustina II the Younger. Aeternitas was the divine personification of eternity. According to Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, Antoninus Pius used Aeternitas to emphasise the 'eternal' nature of the Empire in the person of its good Emperors and Empresses. In this case, it was also likely used to honour the legacy of his late wife.…