Roman

Ancient roman coins were minted from the 3rd century BC until the 5th century AD. Ancient roman coins commonly feature a portrait of an individual (e.g. the emperor) on the obverse and a deity on the reverse. Some of the most detailed portraits of an emperor can be found on an ancient roman coin. In many of these ancient roman coins we see what the roman emperors must have looked like in life. In this section you will also discover Roman Provincial (or Greek Imperial) coins.
Maximinus I, Sestertius, Fides, 236-237 AD

Maximinus Thrax (otherwise known as Maximinus I) was Roman Emperor from 235 to 238 AD. One of 6 emperors during the Year of the Six Emperors, his short reign was marred by continuous plotting against him. His life was ended at the hands of his own soldiers during the Siege of Aquileia.…

Maximinus II Daia, 308-313AD, Syria, Seleucis and Pieria, Antioch, AE2 Silvered Follis, Genius, struck 312 AD

This coin was struck at the Antioch Mint in Syria, known for producing Roman coins of the fine artistic style

Gaius Valerius Galerius Maximinus Daia Augustus, known as Maximinus II or Maximinus Daia, was Roman Emperor from 308 to 313 AD. Although a nephew to Galerius he was born a peasant but rose to prominence after joining the army. He became Caesar when his uncle adopted him shortly after becoming the eastern Augustus. Known for his persecutions of Christians, his reign came to an end after he was defeated by Licinus in the Civil wars of the Tetrarchy.…

Maximinus II Daia, 308-313AD, Syria, Seleucis and Pieria, Antioch, AE2 Silvered Follis, Genius, struck 312 AD

Gaius Valerius Galerius Maximinus Daia Augustus, known as Maximinus II or Maximinus Daia, was Roman Emperor from 308 to 313 AD. Although a nephew to Galerius he was born a peasant but rose to prominence after joining the army. He became Caesar when his uncle adopted him shortly after becoming the eastern Augustus. Known for his persecutions of Christians, his reign came to an end after he was defeated by Licinus in the Civil wars of the Tetrarchy.…

Nero, 54-68 AD, Ae As, Victory, struck c. 65 AD

Possibly the most infamous of the Roman Emperors, Nero ruled Rome from 54 AD until his death by his own hand in 68 AD. From murdering his mother and other political opponents to (according to rumour) starting the great fires of Rome, the stories about his reign paint a picture of a tyrannical and impulsive Emperor that the people of Rome were glad to see gone. Victoria (Victory) on the reverse of this coin is the personification of the goddess of victory. She is the equivalent of Nike, the Greek goddess who is often seen in the hand of Athena on ancient Greek coins.…

Nero, 54-68 AD, Ae As, Victory, struck c. 65 AD

Possibly the most infamous of the Roman Emperors, Nero ruled Rome from 54 AD until his death by his own hand in 68 AD. From murdering his mother and other political opponents to (according to rumour) starting the great fires of Rome, the stories about his reign paint a picture of a tyrannical and impulsive Emperor that the people of Rome were glad to see gone. Victoria (Victory) on the reverse of this coin is the personification of the goddess of victory. She is the equivalent of Nike, the Greek goddess who is often seen in the hand of Athena on ancient Greek coins.…

Nero, 54-68 AD, Egypt, Alexandria, BI Tetradrachm, Bust of Alexandria, Regnal Year 12 (65-66 AD)

Possibly the most infamous of the Roman Emperors, Nero ruled Rome from 54 AD until his death by his own hand in 68 AD. From murdering his mother and other political opponents to (according to rumour) starting the great fires of Rome, the stories about his reign paint a picture of a tyrannical and impulsive Emperor that the people of Rome were glad to see gone. During Nero's reign, the debasement of Alexandrian coinage followed that of the Roman denarius after the great fire of 64 AD. A large number of billon tetradrachms were minted to replace the existing currency. The silver which was recovered through this process was returned to Rome to mint denarii to fund building programs.…

Nero, 54-68 AD, Egypt, Alexandria, BI Tetradrachm, Bust of Alexandria, Regnal Year 12 (65-66 AD)

Possibly the most infamous of the Roman Emperors, Nero ruled Rome from 54 AD until his death by his own hand in 68 AD. From murdering his mother and other political opponents to (according to rumour) starting the great fires of Rome, the stories about his reign paint a picture of a tyrannical and impulsive Emperor that the people of Rome were glad to see gone. During Nero's reign, the debasement of Alexandrian coinage followed that of the Roman denarius after the great fire of 64 AD. A large number of billon tetradrachms were minted to replace the existing currency. The silver which was recovered through this process was returned to Rome to mint denarii to fund building programs.…

Nero, 54-68 AD, Egypt, Alexandria, BI Tetradrachm, Eagle, Regnal Year 11, 64/65 AD

Possibly the most infamous of the Roman Emperors, Nero ruled Rome from 54 AD until his death by his own hand in 68 AD. From murdering his mother and other political opponents to (according to rumour) starting the great fires of Rome, the stories about his reign paint a picture of a tyrannical and impulsive Emperor that the people of Rome were glad to see gone. During Nero's reign, the debasement of Alexandrian coinage followed that of the Roman denarius after the great fire of 64 AD. A large number of billon tetradrachms were minted to replace the existing currency. The silver which was recovered through this process was returned to Rome to mint denarii to fund building programs.…

Nero, 54-68 AD, Egypt, Alexandria, BI Tetradrachm, Eagle, Regnal Year 11, 64/65 AD

Possibly the most infamous of the Roman Emperors, Nero ruled Rome from 54 AD until his death by his own hand in 68 AD. From murdering his mother and other political opponents to (according to rumour) starting the great fires of Rome, the stories about his reign paint a picture of a tyrannical and impulsive Emperor that the people of Rome were glad to see gone. During Nero's reign, the debasement of Alexandrian coinage followed that of the Roman denarius after the great fire of 64 AD. A large number of billon tetradrachms were minted to replace the existing currency. The silver which was recovered through this process was returned to Rome to mint denarii to fund building programs.…

Nero, 54-68 AD, Egypt, Alexandria, BI Tetradrachm, Serapis, Regnal Year 11, 64/65 AD

Possibly the most infamous of the Roman Emperors, Nero ruled Rome from 54 AD until his death by his own hand in 68 AD. From murdering his mother and other political opponents to (according to rumour) starting the great fires of Rome, the stories about his reign paint a picture of a tyrannical and impulsive Emperor that the people of Rome were glad to see gone. During Nero's reign, the debasement of Alexandrian coinage followed that of the Roman denarius after the great fire of 64 AD. A large number of billon tetradrachms were minted to replace the existing currency. The silver which was recovered through this process was returned to Rome to mint denarii to fund building programs.…

Nero, 54-68 AD, Syria, Seleucis and Pieria, Uncertain Mint, AR Tetradrachm, Divus Claudius, struck c. 63-68 AD

The style and latin legends of these tetradrachms distinguishes them from the well known tetradrachms struck in the Antiochian mints of Syria. Sydenham attributes them to a Caesarean mint in Cappadocia. Butcher proposes that these tetradrachms were minted in Caeesarea for use in Syria. Possibly the most infamous of the Roman Emperors, Nero ruled Rome from 54 AD until his death by his own hand in 68 AD. From murdering his mother and other political opponents to (according to rumour) starting the great fires of Rome, the stories about his reign paint a picture of a tyrannical and impulsive Emperor that the people of Rome were glad to see gone.…

Nero, Ae Dupondius, Victory, 65 AD

A budget priced Nero Dupondius. This coin has been discounted due to the coin showing signs of restorative work to the patina and surfaces, particularly noticeable on the reverse. Despite this it is a pleasing coin overall and a welcome entry into any collection.

Possibly the most infamous of the Roman Emperors, Nero ruled Rome from 54 AD until his death by his own hand in 68 AD. From murdering his mother and other political opponents to (according to rumour) starting the great fires of Rome, the stories about his reign paint a picture of a tyrannical and impulsive Emperor that the people of Rome were glad to see gone. Victoria (Victory) on the reverse of this coin is the personification of the goddess of victory. She is the equivalent of Nike, the Greek goddess who is often seen in the hand of Athena on ancient Greek coins.…