Julian II, the Apostate, 360-363 AD, AR Siliqua, struck 361 AD, from the East Harptree Hoard
Ruler/Emperor:
Julian II
City/Region:
Rome, Lugdunum (Lyon) mint, 1st officina
Denomination:
AR Siliqua
Composition:
Silver
Date:
361 AD
Obverse:
FL CL IVLIA NVS P P AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right
Reverse:
VOT/X/MVLT/XX in four lines within wreath; PLVG, in exergue
Size:
17.22mm, 2.05g, 7h
Grade:
EF, toned, lustrous surfaces
Provenance:
Pedigreed: from the 1887 East Harptree, Somerset Hoard (IRBCH 1424), ex Classical Numismatic Group eAuction 407 (11 October 2017), Lot 608
References:
RIC VIII (Lyons) 233; Lyon 276; RSC V 146b; Cohen 146; Voetter 3

List of references used by Ancient Coin Traders


From the East Harptree Hoard, a documented hoard discovered over 130 years.

Julian II 'the Apostate was Roman Emperor from 361 to 363 AD. The last non-Christian emperor of the Roman Emperor, his attempts to bring back ancient roman values and promote Neoplatonic paganism, meant he was later remembered by name Julian the Apostate.

Description from original listing of coin: CNG is pleased to present a selection of coins from the East Harptree Hoard of 1887. This hoard was discovered near the village of East Harptree, located approximately 16 miles southwest of Bath. The hoard consisted of 1496 silver coins, five silver ingots, and a Roman silver ring set with a carnelian intaglio stone. The coins are 4th century, covering the period of Constantine the Great to Gratian (circa AD 306 to 383). The landowner, Mr. William Kettlewell, made the hoard available to the British Museum, and it was first written up by John Evans in The Numismatic Chronicle of 1888 (pp. 22-46). The British Museum kept 25 of the most interesting coins from the hoard, and the rest of hoard was returned to the owner.

A portion of the hoard, along with the original jug that contained them, was given to a local church for display by William Kettlewell’s son, Colonel Kettlewell. These were eventually stolen. Many years later, the balance of the hoard, nearly 1200 pieces, was given to the father of the individual who subsequently consigned the hoard to Spink, where they were sold last September. Spink wrote-up the hoard for their INSIDER Magazine (Summer 2016 issue). Overall, the quality of the Harptree Hoard is exceptional. The coins exhibit beautiful surfaces with lovely cabinet toning, with very little clipping – remarkable condition for coins of this period.

A rare opportunity to own a coin from a documented hoard found 130 years ago.