Corinthia, Corinth, AR Stater, ca. 375-300 BC
City/Region:
Corinthia, Corinth
Denomination:
AR Stater
Composition:
Silver
Date:
Second half of Fourth Century BC ca. 375-300 BC
Obverse:
Pegasus galloping left; beneath Ϙ (koppa)
Reverse:
Head of Athena left in Corinthian helmet over leather cap; helmet wreathed; in field beneath, flanking neck truncation, A-P; to right, eagle standing left, facing right
Size:
21.20mm, 8.6g, 3h
Grade:
gVF, weak obverse strike, lustrous surfaces
Provenance:
ex Triskeles Auction 21 (29 September 2017), Lot 78; ex Stack's (New York)
References:
Pegasi I 426; SNG Copenhagen 73-74; SNG Soutzos 839; BMC Corinth [Corinthia] p. 26, 258-259; Ravel 1008; BCD Corinth 101; Cammann 39e; HGC 4, 1848; SGCV I, 2631 var. (Delta-I, Artemis to right)

List of references used by Ancient Coin Traders


Corinth was one of the richest and most important cities in ancient Greece. Situated on the isthmus which connected Peloponnesos and central Greece it formed its own colonies, notably Syracuse and Corcyra in 733 BC. It fought in the Peloponnesian war (with Sparta, against Athens), as well as the Corinthian war (against Sparta, with Athens, but then later again with Sparta). In 338 BC, King Philip II of Macedon created the League of Corinth, uniting Greece in a war against Persia. The Corinthian staters with the head of Athena wearing a Corinthian helmet and the flying Pegasus are almost as identifiable as belonging to Corinth, as the famous owl tetradrachms are to Athens. Incidentally both coins prominently feature Athena.