Akarnania, Anaktorion, AR Stater, ca. 350-300 BC
City/Region:
Akarnania, Anaktorion
Denomination:
AR Stater of the Corinthian type
Composition:
Silver
Date:
Second half of Fourth Century BC ca. 375-300 BC
Obverse:
Pegasus galloping left; beneath, AN monogram
Reverse:
Head of Athena left in Corinthian helmet over leather cap; to right, A-N (faint), lyre
Size:
21 mm, 7.99 g, 7 h
Grade:
VF, well centred, toned, some roughness and erosion
Provenance:
ex Triskeles Auction 21 (29 September 2017), ex Artemide Aste;
References:
Pegasi II 37; SNG Copenhagen 286; BMC Corinth [Anactorium] p. 116, 18; BCD Akarnania 82; SNG Soutzos 498 var. (omphalos); SGCV I 2248 var. (momogram, wreathed helmet)

List of references used by Ancient Coin Traders


Anaktorion was a Corinthian colony in ancient Greece. Like other colonies, it issued staters in the style of the famous Corinthian types, notably to support Corinth in the Pelopponesian war and later, to support Timoleon and his 700 mercenaries, on his mission to establish democracy in Syracuse and resettle Sicily with Greeks. Corinth was one of the richest and most important cities in ancient Greece. Situated on the isthmus which connected Peloponnesos and central Greece it formed its own colonies, notably Syracuse and Corcyra in 733 BC. It fought in the Peloponnesian war (with Sparta, against Athens), as well as the Corinthian war (against Sparta, with Athens, but then later again with Sparta). In 338 BC, King Philip II of Macedon created the League of Corinth, uniting Greece in a war against Persia. The Corinthian staters with the head of Athena wearing a Corinthian helmet and the flying Pegasus are almost as identifiable as belonging to Corinth, as the famous owl tetradrachms are to Athens. Incidentally both coins prominently feature Athena.